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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Strategies for Management of Soilborne Diseases of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Verticillium wilt in the Pacific Northwest

Authors
item Dung, Jeremiah -
item Weiland, Gerald
item Pscheidt, Jay -

Submitted to: Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Control Handbook
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2013
Publication Date: January 2, 2014
Citation: Dung, J., Weiland, G.E., Pscheidt, J.W. 2014. Verticillium wilt in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Control Handbook. p. 3-22 to 3-28.

Interpretive Summary: Verticillium wilt is a serious disease of many economically important agricultural and horticultural crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). The disease affects herbaceous annuals and perennials as well as woody trees and shrubs. Plants affected by Verticillium wilt exhibit chlorosis, wilting, defoliation, and plant death. The disease can reduce the yield of agricultural crops as well as the lifespan of plants in landscapes and perennial cropping systems. Verticillium wilt is most effectively managed by the use of resistant crop species and cultivars, and by preventing the introduction of Verticillium wilt pathogens into production fields.

Technical Abstract: Verticillium wilt is a serious disease of many economically important agricultural and horticultural crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). The disease affects herbaceous annuals and perennials as well as woody trees and shrubs. Plants affected by Verticillium wilt exhibit chlorosis, wilting, defoliation, and plant death. The disease can reduce the yield of agricultural crops as well as the lifespan of plants in landscapes and perennial cropping systems. Verticillium wilt is most effectively managed by the use of resistant crop species and cultivars, and by preventing the introduction of Verticillium wilt pathogens into production fields.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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