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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Enhancement of Hard Spring Wheat, Durum, and Oat Quality

Location: Cereal Crops Research

Title: Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications

Authors
item Sivapragasam, Nilushni -
item Thavarajah, Pushparajah -
item Ohm, Jae-Bom
item Thavarajah, Dilrukshi -

Submitted to: Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 26, 2014
Publication Date: May 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58848
Citation: Sivapragasam, N., Thavarajah, P., Ohm, J.-B., Thavarajah, D. 2014. Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre. 3:115-121.

Interpretive Summary: The biomaterials that are processed to particle size of micro meter scale are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study reports the production of carbohydrate-rich micro scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The carbohydrate-rich fractions were isolated from sugar pulp. They were composed of 84% non- sucrose carbohydrates and small amount of fat (13.0%), protein (1.2%), and ash (0.9%) The carbohydrate-rich fractions were used to prepare micro scale materials. Micro scale materials showed tube-like structures with lengths ranging from 22.5 ± 0.9 µm and cavities of the tubules ranging from 3.9 ± 1.2 µm when observed through scanning electron microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope. The stability of these micro scale tube-like materials was studied by dissolution and digestion studies. When these materials were digested under similar condition to human stomach and intestine they showed digestion rates of 45-56% and 45-58%, respectively. When these materials were dissolved in solution containing enzymes that act to digest starch in human body such as a-amylase and amyloglucosidase, the digestion rate was 34.1%. The chemical structure of the micro scale materials were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. It also indicated that they could be digested by human enzymes. Furthermore, the materials maintained their structure stably when heated to 133 C. Overall, the results clearly showed that the micro scale materials can be produced from non-sucrose fraction of sugar beet pulp; this material can be incorporated in food and pharmaceutical applications as encapsulating or packaging materials.

Technical Abstract: Bio-based micro scale materials are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study produced carbohydrate-based micro scale tubular materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The isolated carbohydrates were composed of 84% non-sucrose carbohydrates and small amount of fat (13.0%), protein (1.2%), and ash (0.9%). These highly pure carbohydrates were used to prepare micro scale materials. Microscale tubular structures with lengths ranging from 22.5 ± 0.9 µm and cavities of the tubules ranging from 3.9 ± 1.2 µm were observed through Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The stability of these micro scale tubular materials was studied by dissolution and digestion studies. The degrees of dissolution under simulated stomach and intestine conditions were 45-56% and 45-58%, respectively. The pancreatic enzymatic digestion with a-amylase and amyloglucosidase was 34.1%. In addition the X-ray diffraction showed the presence of A type structures, which represents the susceptibility of the materials for enzyme digestion. Furthermore, the material was thermally stable up to 133 C (exothermic peak) with a distinct endothermic peak at 60 C. Overall, the results clearly showed that the micro scale materials can be produced from non-sucrose fraction of sugar beet pulp; this material can be incorporated in food and pharmaceutical applications as encapsulating or packaging materials.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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