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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREAWIDE PROGRAMS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Predation of Indianmeal moth larvae by Lyctocoris campestris(F.) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) in different stored commodities

Authors
item Meagher, Robert
item Locke, L -

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 4, 1997
Publication Date: July 1, 1997
Citation: Meagher Jr, R.L., Locke, L.A. 1997. Predation of Indianmeal moth larvae by Lyctocoris campestris(F.) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) in different stored commodities. Journal of Entomological Science. 32(3):271-280.

Interpretive Summary: Predation rates for the anthocorid predator Lyctocoris campestris (F.) against varying densities of late-instar Plodia interpunctello (Hubner) were compared in whole corn, whole wheat, or rolled oat stored commodities. Scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Veterinary and Agricultural Entomology in Gainesville, Florida, found more prey were attacked in corn and wheat than in oats, and female predators generally fed on more larvae than did male predators. Predation increased with an increase in prey density. This relationship was best described by a Type II functional response equation. Our results suggest that commodity type affects the number of prey attacked by this predator.

Technical Abstract: Predation rates for the anthocorid predator Lyctocoris campestris (F.) against varying densities of late-instar Plodia interpunctello (Hubner) were compared in whole corn, whole wheat, or folled oat stored commodities. More prey were attacked in corn and wheat than in oats, and female predators generally fed on more larvae than did male predators. Predation increased with an increase in prey density. This relationship was best described by a Type II functional response equation. Our results suggest that commodity type affects the number of prey attacked by this predator.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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