Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREAWIDE PROGRAMS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Evaluation of Serangium parcesetosum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly

Authors
item Legaspi, Jesusa -
item Legaspi, B -
item Meagher, Robert
item Ciomperlik, M. -

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 16, 1996
Publication Date: December 1, 1996
Citation: Legaspi, J.C., Legaspi, B.C., Meagher Jr, R.L., Ciomperlik, M.A. 1996. Evaluation of Serangium parcesetosum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly. Environmental Entomology. 25(6):1421-1427.

Interpretive Summary: The coccinellid predator from India, was studied by scientists at the USDA Agriculture Research Service, Center for Medical, Veterinary and Agricultural Entomology in Gainesville, Florida, as a potential biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring [also known as the sweetpotato whitefly, B. tahaci (Gennadius) Biotype B]. Studies were performed on prey preference, and effects of host plant on predation, and temperature on life–histoty and predation rates. In one test, the predator was offered simultaneously 5 prey choices: corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) eggs; tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta (L.) eggs; and =200 eggs and early instars of B. argentifolii reared on poinsettias, cantaloupes, or cucumbers. S. parcesetosum did not consume any lepidopteran eggs; however, they devoured nearly all whitefly prey offered averaging =600 prey per 24–h feeding period. Mean adult longevities were 27.6 d on cantaloupe, 24.5 d on cucumber, 44.2 d on hibiscus, and 27.8 d on tomato. Each S. parcesetosum adult consumed = 170–200 whitefly eggs and immatures per 12–h feeding period. The predation rate was highest on cucumbers, followed by tomato and cantaloupe, and lowest on hibiscus. Under constant temperature conditions of 20, 30, and 40°C, adults survived best at 20°C with a mean longevity of =75 d. Adults lived =25 d at 30°C, whereas, 40°C resulted in death within 3 d. Predation rate was found to increase with temperature. The mean number of total immature B. argentifolii consumed by S. parcesetosum adults was 138.9, 180.8, and 187.4 per 12–h feeding period at 20, 30, and 40°C, respectively. The maximum cumulative lifetime predation was measured at >10,000 whiteflies consumed in the most long–lived indviduals, despite feeding only 12 h/d at ] – to 3–d intervals. Mean cumulative lifetime predation was measured at 4,909.5, 2,586.1, and 224.9 whiteflies at 20, 30, and 40°C, respectively. Because of its voracity in both immature and adult stages, and its apparent preference for whiteRies, including B. argentifolii (compared with lepidopteran eggs), S. parcesetosum is a promising biological control agent against the silverleaf whitefly.

Technical Abstract: The coccinellid predator from India, Serangium parcesetosum Sicard, was studied as a potential biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring [also known as the sweetpotato whitefly, B. tahaci (Gennadius) Biotype B]. Studies were performed on prey preference, and effects of host plant on predation, and temperature on life–histoty and predation rates. In one test, the predator was offered simultaneously 5 prey choices: corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) eggs; tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta (L.) eggs; and =200 eggs and early instars of B. argentifolii reared on poinsettias, cantaloupes, or cucumbers. S. parcesetosum did not consume any lepidopteran eggs; however, they devoured nearly all whitefly prey offered averaging =600 prey per 24–h feeding period. Mean adult longevities were 27.6 d on cantaloupe, 24.5 d on cucumber, 44.2 d on hibiscus, and 27.8 d on tomato. Each S. parcesetosum adult consumed = 170–200 whitefly eggs and immatures per 12–h feeding period. The predation rate was highest on cucumbers, followed by tomato and cantaloupe, and lowest on hibiscus. Under constant temperature conditions of 20, 30, and 40°C, adults survived best at 20°C with a mean longevity of =75 d. Adults lived =25 d at 30°C, whereas, 40°C resulted in death within 3 d. Predation rate was found to increase with temperature. The mean number of total immature B. argentifolii consumed by S. parcesetosum adults was 138.9, 180.8, and 187.4 per 12–h feeding period at 20, 30, and 40°C, respectively. The maximum cumulative lifetime predation was measured at >10,000 whiteflies consumed in the most long–lived indviduals, despite feeding only 12 h/d at ] – to 3–d intervals. Mean cumulative lifetime predation was measured at 4,909.5, 2,586.1, and 224.9 whiteflies at 20, 30, and 40°C, respectively. Because of its voracity in both immature and adult stages, and its apparent preference for whiteRies, including B. argentifolii (compared with lepidopteran eggs), S. parcesetosum is a promising biological control agent against the silverleaf whitefly.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page