Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY Title: Effects of a school-based intensive intervention on systemic inflammation and disease risk in Mexican-American children

Authors
item Whitney, Breslin -
item Johnston, Craig -
item Moreno, Jennette -
item Foreyt, John -
item Mcfarlin, Brian -

Submitted to: Annual Scientific Meeting NAASO, The Obesity Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 13, 2012
Publication Date: September 21, 2012
Citation: Whitney, B.L., Johnston, C.A., Moreno, J.P., Foreyt, J.P., McFarlin, B.K. 2012. Effects of a school-based intensive intervention on systemic inflammation and disease risk in Mexican-American children [abstract]. In: Proceedings 30th Annual Scientific Meeting NAASO, The Obesity Society, September 20-24, 2013, San Antonio, Texas. p. s129-s130.

Technical Abstract: Childhood obesity is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Systemic inflammation is thought to mediate this relationship. We have previously demonstrated that an intervention designed specifically for Mexican-American children that incorporates both physical activity and nutrition counseling leads to a reduction in zBMI. Thus, this intervention may subsequently reduce obesity-related systemic inflammation and disease risk. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-month school-based intensive intervention on circulating markers of systemic inflammation and disease risk. Mexican-American children (12-13 y) classified as either normal weight, overweight, or obese participated in a 6-month physical activity/nutrition program designed to maintain or reduce zBMI. IL-6, IL-10, TNF-a, MCP-1, and CX3CL1 were measured as markers of inflammation using a multiplex assay. Total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin were measured using an enzymatic assay. Our results indicated that at baseline, obese children have significantly greater circulating MCP-1 (P=0.015) and TNF-a (P=0.002), along with elevated triglycerides (P<0.001) and reduced HDL (P=0.033), compared to healthy weight children. We are in the process of analyzing data to determine how these outcome variables changed over the course of an intervention, designed to reduce zBMI. As demonstrated, childhood obesity results in an increase in systemic inflammation and disease risk. Reducing zBMI through an intensive intervention may concurrently reduce systematic inflammation and disease risk.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page