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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED NUTRIENT EFFICIENCY OF BEEF CATTLE AND SWINE

Location: Nutrition and Environmental Management Research

Title: Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain

Authors
item LINDHOLM-PERRY, AMANDA
item KUEHN, LARRY
item OLIVER, WILLIAM
item Sexten, Andrea -
item MILES, JEREMY
item REMPEL, LEA
item CUSHMAN, ROBERT
item FREETLY, HARVEY

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 18, 2013
Publication Date: November 20, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58066
Citation: Lindholm-Perry, A.K., Kuehn, L.A., Oliver, W.T., Sexten, A.K., Miles, J.R., Rempel, L.A., Cushman, R.A., Freetly, H.C. 2013. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain. PLoS One. 8(11):e80882.

Interpretive Summary: Feed is the single largest input cost associated with beef production. Cattle differ in their ability to convert feed to meat and those differences are heritable. Previous research by scientists at the U. S. Meat Animal Research Center identified a region of DNA associated with genetic differences in feed intake, growth, and meat quality. The two genes that are coded for in this region, NCAPG and LCORL, were found to be differentially expressed in adipose and muscle tissue of cattle that differ in feed intake and weight gain in this study. The expression of LCORL in adipose tissue of heifers and cows and it expression in muscle of steers was correlated with variation in feed intake. The expression of NCAPG in the muscle of cows was correlated with the variation in ADG. These data support our earlier genetic associations with feed intake and body weight gain within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues.

Technical Abstract: A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only), cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P=0.05). In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r=0.26; P=0.009). A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P=0.04). LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P=0.01). These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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