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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WHAT WE EAT IN AMERICA - DIETARY SURVEY: DATA COLLECTION, INTERPRETATION, DISSEMINATION, AND METHODOLOGY

Location: Food Surveys

Title: Consumption of pizza in the United States, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2007-2010

Authors
item Rhodes, Donna
item Adler, Meghan
item Clemens, John
item Lacomb, Randy
item Moshfegh, Alanna

Submitted to: Worldwide Web Site: Food Surveys Research Group
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: December 10, 2013
Publication Date: February 7, 2014
Citation: Rhodes, D.G., Adler, M.E., Clemens, J.C., LaComb, R.P., Moshfegh, A.J. 2014. Consumption of pizza in the United States, What We Eat in America, NHANES 2007-2010. Worldwide Web Site: Food Surveys Research Group. Available: www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=19476.

Interpretive Summary: Although pizza is recognized as a high consumption food and a contributor of nutrients of public significance, limited data are available on the intake of pizza in the United States. Using nationally representative survey data from 2007-2010, this research presents results on pizza consumption among U.S. children and adults and details nutrient contribution from pizza among those who ate pizza. On any given day, 20% of children and 11% of adults consumed pizza. On the day individuals ate pizza, it provided over one-fourth of the day’s energy intake. Pizza also contributed about one-third of the daily intakes for total fat, sodium and calcium, and more than half of the daily intake for lycopene. This research emphasizes the sizeable impact a single food can have on nutrient intakes of Americans.

Technical Abstract: Pizza is recognized as a high consumption food and a contributor of nutrients of public significance in the American diet including fat, calcium, and sodium. This research presents results on pizza consumption among U.S. children (2-19 years) and adults (20 years and over) and details nutrient contribution from pizza among those who consumed pizza. The study sample (n=17,571) included nationally representative data from individuals 2 years and over (excluding breast-fed children) participating in What We Eat in America, NHANES 2007-2008 and 2009-2010. Dietary intake data were obtained from an in-person 24-hour recall, collected using the interviewer-administered 5-step USDA Automated Multiple-Pass Method. Overall, 13% of the U.S. population consumed pizza on any given day; a higher percentage of children consumed pizza than adults, 20% vs. 11%, respectively. On the day consumed, pizza provided approximately 27% of total energy intake among consumers of pizza – individuals who reported pizza, in any amount, at least once on the intake day. When consumed, pizza contributed about one-third of the daily intakes for total fat, sodium and calcium, and more than half of the daily intake for lycopene. For children, 44% of pizza consumption occurred at lunch and 42% occurred at dinner. For adults, the majority of pizza consumption (59%) occurred at dinner. This research emphasizes the sizeable impact a single food can have on nutrient intakes of Americans.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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