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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Hard Winter Wheat to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

Location: Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit

Title: Virulence and biotype analyses of Hessian Fly (Mayetiola destructor) populations from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma

Authors
item Garces-Carrera, Sandra -
item Knutson, Allen -
item Wang, Haiyan -
item Giles, Kristopher -
item Huang, Fangneng -
item Whitworth, Robert -
item Smith, Charles -
item Chen, Ming-Shun

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 3, 2013
Publication Date: February 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1603/EC13372
Citation: Garces-Carrera, S., Knutson, A., Wang, H., Giles, K.L., Huang, F., Whitworth, R.J., Smith, C.M., Chen, M. 2014. Virulence and biotype analyses of Hessian Fly (Mayetiola destructor) populations from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Journal of Economic Entomology. 107(1): 417-423.

Interpretive Summary: The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a major pest of wheat, and is controlled mainly through deploying fly-resistant wheat cultivars. Change in Hessian fly populations in the field is often rapid and wheat cultivars may lose resistance within 6-8 years. To ensure continuous success of host plant resistance, Hessian fly populations in the field need to be constantly monitored to determine which resistance genes remain effective in different geographic regions. This study investigated five Hessian fly populations collected from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma, where infestation by Hessian fly has been high in recent years. Eight resistance genes including H12, H13, H17, H18, H22, H25, H26, and Hdic, were found to be highly effective against all tested Hessian fly populations in this region, conferring resistance to 80% or more of plants containing one of these resistance genes. The frequencies of biotypes virulent to resistance genes H13 (biotype vH13), H18 (vH18), H21 (vH21), H25 (vH25), H26 (vH26), and Hdic (vHdic) were determined, and were found to vary from population to population, ranging from 0 to 45%. A logistic regression model was established to predict biotype frequencies based on the correlation between the percentages of susceptible plants obtained in a virulence test and the log-odds of virulent biotype frequencies determined by a traditional approach.

Technical Abstract: The Hessian fly is a major pest of wheat, and is controlled mainly through deploying fly-resistant wheat cultivars. Changes in Hessian fly populations in the field may quickly overcome fly-resistance of wheat cultivars within a few years, thus continuous monitoring dynamics of Hessian fly populations in the field facilitate timely deployment of resistance genes in different geographic regions. This study investigated five Hessian fly populations collected from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma, where infestation by Hessian fly has been high in recent years. Eight resistance genes (H12, H13, H17, H18, H22, H25, H26, and Hdic) were found to be highly effective against all tested Hessian fly populations in these regions, which conferred resistance to at least 80% of plants containing one of these resistance genes. The frequencies of biotypes virulent to H13 (biotype vH13), H18 (vH18), H21 (vH21), H25 (vH25), H26 (vH26), and Hdic (vHdic) ranged from 0 to 45% varying with populations, A model was established to predict biotype frequencies based on the correlation between the percentages of susceptible plants obtained in a simple virulence test and the virulent biotype frequencies determined through a traditional approach. The results provide valuable information for breeders, wheat growers, and other stake holders for breeding and deploying resistant cultivars for Hessian fly management.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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