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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: UTILIZATION OF A SKIN CAROTENOID DETECTION DEVICE TO DETERMINE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE Title: Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies

Authors
item Mayne, Susan -
item Cartmel, Brenda -
item Scarmo, Stephanie -
item Jahns, Lisa
item Ermakov, Igor -
item Gellermann, Werner -

Submitted to: Archives Of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 13, 2013
Publication Date: July 6, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58057
Citation: Mayne, S.T., Cartmel, B., Scarmo, S., Jahns, L.A., Ermakov, I.V., Gellermann, W. 2013. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies. Archives Of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 539 (2013) 163–170.

Interpretive Summary: Americans currently do not eat enough fruits and vegetables (F/V). Intervention efforts to increase F/V consumption generally rely on self-reported intake to assess the effectiveness of the interventions, but self-reported intake is subject to many biases. Carotenoids are found in many F/V and blood status is considered the best biomarker of F/V intake, but measurement is invasive and relatively expensive. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a rapid non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript reviews research relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary (e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid F/V-enriched diet), demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes.

Technical Abstract: Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status, as assessed by RRS, has been suggested as a promising biomarker for use in human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, adiposity, and genetics. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary (e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable-enriched diet), demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence thus supports the use of skin carotenoid status as assessed by RRS as an objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater fruit and vegetable intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds considerable promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of fruit and vegetable intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes in the future.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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