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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Biology and Biological Control of Root Diseases of Wheat, Barley and Biofuel Brassicas

Location: Root Disease and Biological Control Research

Title: Spring wheat tolerance and resistance to Heterodera avenae in the Pacific Northwest

Authors
item Smiley, Richard W. -
item Marshall, Juliet -
item Gourlie, Jennifer -
item Paulitz, Timothy
item Kandel, Shyam -
item Pumphrey, Michael -
item Garland-Campbell, Kimberly
item Yan, Guiping -
item Anderson, Monte -
item Flowers, Michael -
item Jackson, Chad -

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2013
Publication Date: May 20, 2013
Citation: Smiley, R., Marshall, J.M., Gourlie, J.A., Paulitz, T.C., Kandel, S.L., Pumphrey, M.O., Garland Campbell, K.A., Yan, G., Anderson, M.D., Flowers, M.D., Jackson, C.A. 2013. Spring wheat tolerance and resistance to Heterodera avenae in the Pacific Northwest. Plant Disease. 97(5):590-600.

Interpretive Summary: Spring wheat varieties were screened for tolerance and resistance in infested field plots in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington over two years. Undefined resistance was identified in one commercial cultivar (‘WBRockland)and four breeding lines (UC1711, SO900163, SY-B041418,and SY-97621-05). This research was the first systematic field demonstrationof potential benefits to be derived through development and deployment of cultivars with resistance plus tolerance to cereal cyst nematode in North America.

Technical Abstract: The cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae reduces wheat yields in the Pacific Northwest. Previous evaluations of cultivar resistance had been in controlled environments. Cultivar tolerance had not been evaluated. Seven spring wheat trials were conducted in naturally infested fields in three states over 2 years. A split-plot design was used for all trials. Five trials evaluated both tolerance and resistance in 1.8-by-9-m plots treated or not treated with nematicides. Two trials evaluated resistance in 1-m head rows where each wheat entry was paired with an adjacent row of a susceptible cultivar. Cultivars with the Cre1 resistance gene (‘Ouyen’ and ‘Chara’) reduced the postharvest density of H. avenae under field conditions, confirming Cre1 parents as useful for germplasm development. Ouyen was resistant but it was also intolerant, producing significantly lower grain yield in controls than in plots treated with nematicides. Susceptible cultivars varied in tolerance. Undefined resistance was identified in one commercial cultivar (‘WBRockland) and four breeding lines (UC1711, SO900163, SY-B041418, and SY-97621-05). This research was the first systematic field demonstration of potential benefits to be derived through development and deployment of cultivars with resistance plus tolerance to cereal cyst nematode in North America.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014