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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING SOYBEAN YIELD LOSSES THROUGH GENETIC IMPROVEMENT Title: Colonization of Clonostachys rosea on soybean root inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

Authors
item Pan, Fengjuan -
item Xue, G -
item Mclaughlin, B -
item Li, Shuxian
item Xu, Yanli -
item Zhao, Dan -
item Qu, Hongyun -

Submitted to: Acta Agriculture Scandinavica Section B – Soil & Plant Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 8, 2013
Publication Date: December 5, 2013
Citation: Pan, F., Xue, G.A., Mclaughlin, B.N., Li, S., Xu, Y., Zhao, D., Qu, H. 2013. Colonization of Clonostachys rosea on soybean root inoculated with Fusarium graminearum. Acta Agriculture Scandinavica Section B – Soil & Plant Science. 63(6):564-569.

Interpretive Summary: Soybean root rot, caused by the fungus (mold) Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease. The fungus Clonostachys rosea has been reported to provide protection against plant pathogens in different crops. The objectives of this study were to determine if a strain of C. rosea (ACM941) can colonize soybean root that were inoculated with F. graminearum, and to test if the distribution of C. rosea changed with rooting depths. Results showed that there was less C. rosea growing on the tap root and secondary roots growing below ground level 8-13 cm than sections of roots growing 0-3 cm or 3-8 cm below ground level. The existence of F. graminearum had no effect on the growth of ACM941.

Technical Abstract: Soybean root rot, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease. Clonostachys rosea has been reported to have protection against plant pathogens in different crops. The objectives of this study were to determine if a strain of C. rosea (ACM941) can colonize soybean root that were inoculated with F. graminearum, and to test if the distribution of C. rosea changed with rooting depths. There were three treatments in this study, which included a control (CK) using normal seed without any fungal treatments; seed inoculated with ACM941; and seed treated with ACM941 and inoculated with F. graminearum (ACM + Fg). Results showed that the CUF of ACM941 was lower on the tap roots and secondary roots growing below ground level 8-13 cm than sections of roots growing 0-3 cm or 3-8 cm below ground level. ACM941 was found in roots at the third day after soybean seed were sown, and maintained high CFU most of the time during soybean growth. Inoculation of F. graminearum had no effect on CUF of ACM941. The ACM941 strain colonized soybean root rapidly and was not affected by the existence of F. graminearum.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014