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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING PESTS OF SUBTROPICAL ROW CROPS Title: Comparison of cotton square and boll damage and resulting lint and seed loss caused by verde plant bug, Creontiades signatus

Authors
item Brewer, Michael -
item Anderson, Darwin -
item Armstrong, John

Submitted to: Southwestern Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 24, 2012
Publication Date: August 1, 2012
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56832
Citation: Brewer, M.J., Anderson, D.J., Armstrong, J.S. 2012. Comparison of cotton square and boll damage and resulting lint and seed loss caused by verde plant bug, Creontiades signatus. Southwestern Entomologist. 37(4):437-447.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton fruit retention of bolls and squares, boll damage, and the lint and seed weight loss were evaluated in 2010 and 2011 for different age for classes of on fruiting branches exposed to verde plant bug, a plant bug pest of cotton. Low fruit retention of less than 20% was observed in young bolls younger than 7 d old in the first two fruiting positions from the main stem compared with greater than 80% retention in controls not exposed to verde plant bug. In infested cages, fruit retention of these young bolls was significantly lower than fruit retention of older bolls and squares within 2-3 days of bloom and younger. Similar to fruit retention results, damage of harvested bolls and lint and seed weight (using zero for abscised fruit) differed among the age classes of infested branches and uninfested controls primarily for fruiting positions one (2010 and 2011) and two (2011). The first two fruiting positions of fruiting branches were the main contributors to plant productivity differences seen in lint and seed weight. Overall, verde plant bugs when given a feeding choice reduced fruit retention in young bolls younger than 7 d old, damaged retained bolls younger than 11 d old, and larger bolls and young squares at least 2-3 d from bloom incurred significant less abscission and damage. These results supported the interpretation that low fruit retention and high damage of young bolls justified a focus on protecting young bolls in a pest management program, especially during early to peak bloom when young bolls are abundant.

Technical Abstract: Retention of bolls and squares (referred to as fruit retention), boll damage, and resulting cotton lint and seed weight loss were assessed when two (2010) and three (2011) age classes of sympodial fruiting branches with different ages of squares and bolls where exposed to verde plant bug, Creontiades signatus Distant (Hemiptera: Miridae), in branch cages in the field. A strong upward trend was observed in fruit retention from the youngest to the oldest branch age treatment for both years. Low fruit retention (< 20%) was seen in young bolls < 7 d old in the first two fruiting positions from the main stem compared with > 80% retention in controls not exposed to verde plant bug. In infested cages, fruit retention of these young bolls was significantly lower than fruit retention of older bolls and squares within 2-3 days of bloom and younger. Similar to fruit retention results, damage of harvested bolls and lint and seed weight (using zero for abscised fruit) differed among the age classes of infested branches and uninfested controls primarily for fruiting positions one (2010 and 2011) and two (2011). The first two fruiting positions were the main contributors to plant productivity differences seen in lint and seed weight. Overall, verde plant bugs when given a feeding choice reduced fruit retention in young bolls < 7 d old, damaged retained bolls < 11 d old, and larger bolls and young squares at least 2-3 d from bloom incurred significant less abscission and damage. These results supported the interpretation that low fruit retention and high damage of young bolls justified a focus on protecting young bolls in a pest management program, especially during early to peak bloom when young bolls are abundant.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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