Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL MANAGEMENT FOR ENHANCED AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY AND SUSTAINABLE BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK PRODUCTION Title: Evaluation of a proposed standardized analytical method for the determination of humic and fulvic acids in commercial products

Authors
item Lamar, Richard -
item Olk, Daniel
item Mayhew, Lawrence -
item Bloom, Paul -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 9, 2012
Publication Date: February 4, 2013
Citation: Lamar, R., Olk, D.C., Mayhew, L., Bloom, P.R. 2013. Evaluation of a proposed standardized analytical method for the determination of humic and fulvic acids in commercial products. In: Xu, J., Wu, J., He, Z., editors. Functions of Natural Organic Matter in a Changing Environment. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer. p. 1071-1073.

Technical Abstract: A constraint to growth of the commercial humic products industry has been the lack of a widely accepted procedure for determining humic acid and fulvic acid concentrations of the products, which has raised regulatory issues. On behalf of the U.S.-based Humic Products Trade Association, we developed an improved procedure that measures humic acids and fulvic acids gravimetrically. The humic acid is isolated by the traditional acidification to pH 1 of a base extract, although solution C and salts must be diluted to specified concentration ranges. The fulvic acid is defined as the hydrophobic material that is adsorbed onto a DAX-8 resin column when the base- and acid-soluble material is passed through the column. Following separation, both the humic acid and fulvic acid fractions are oven-dried and weighed. The method has high precision, indicating good reproducibility in discriminating between humic acids and fulvic acids. This method can distinguish humic acids and fulvic acids from several potential adulterants, including amino acids and carbohydrates. However, it cannot distinguish lignosulphonates from fulvic acids.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page