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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POTATO GERMPLASM ENHANCEMENT THROUGH TRAIT DISCOVERY, GENETIC EVALUATION AND INCORPORATION Title: Developmental effects on phenolic, flavonol, anthocyanin, and carotenoid metabolites and gene expression in potatoes

Authors
item Payyavula, Raja -
item Navarre, Duroy
item Kuhl, Joseph -
item Pantoja, Alberto -

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 21, 2013
Publication Date: July 31, 2013
Citation: Payyavula, R., Navarre, D.A., Kuhl, J., Pantoja, A. 2013. Developmental effects on phenolic, flavonol, anthocyanin, and carotenoid metabolites and gene expression in potatoes. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 61:7357-7365.

Interpretive Summary: This study shows that immature potatoes have higher amounts of certain flavonols, anthocyanins, carotenoids, total protein and phenolic acids than at maturity. These compounds are dietarily desirable because they have been shown to have numerous health-promoting effects in various studies. Immature potatoes like those used in this study are marketed as “baby potatoes,” and the greater amounts of these dietarily desirable compounds may appeal to health-conscious consumers.

Technical Abstract: Potato phytonutrients include phenolic acids, flavonols, anthocyanins and carotenoids. Developmental effects on phytonutrient concentrations and gene expression was studied in white, yellow and purple potatoes. Purple potatoes contained the most total phenolics, which decreased during development (14 to 10 mg g-1), as did activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase. The major phenolic, 5-chlorogenic acid (5CGA), decreased during development in all cultivars. Products of later branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway also decreased, including quercetin 3-O rutinoside, kaempferol 3-rutinoside and petunidin 3-(p-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-3-glucoside (from 6.4 to 4.0 mg g-1). Violaxanthin and lutein were the two most abundant carotenoids and decreased 30 to 70% in the yellow and white potatoes. Sucrose, which can regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism, decreased with development in all cultivars and was highest in purple potatoes. Total protein decreased by 15%-30% in two cultivars. Expression of most phenylpropanoid and carotenoid structural genes decreased during development. Immature potatoes like those used in this study are marketed as “baby potatoes,” and the greater amounts of these dietarily desirable compounds may appeal to health-conscious consumers.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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