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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Increasing Inland Pacific Northwest Wheat Production Profitability

Location: Soil and Water Conservation Research

Title: Spring wheat production and associated pests in conventional and diversified cropping systems in north central Montana

Authors
item Lenssen, Andrew -
item Long, Daniel
item Grey, William -
item Blodgett, Sue -
item Goosey, Hayes -

Submitted to: Crop Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2013
Publication Date: October 25, 2013
Citation: Lenssen, A., Long, D.S., Grey, W.E., Blodgett, S.L., Goosey, H.B. 2013. Spring wheat production and associated pests in conventional and diversified cropping systems in north central Montana. Crop Management. Available: http://works.bepress.com/andrew_lenssen/29.

Interpretive Summary: Spring wheat yields and associated pests were compared in conventional and intensified, diversified rotations. Conventional rotations (spring wheat-spring barley-fallow and spring wheat-fallow) were diversified and intensified by replacing fallow with pulses and oilseeds. Soil water at time of planting was less in diversified rotations, but residual nitrate was not influenced by rotation type. Wheat stem sawfly, other insect pests, and beneficial insects were in greater numbers in conventional rotations. Crown and root rots of wheat were similar between rotation types, but foliar leafspot diseases were greater for wheat in conventional rotations. Weed densities were not influenced by rotation type. Spring wheat yield, tiller density, and test weight were greater in conventional rotations. Spring wheat in diversified, intensified rotations had greater drought stress and grain protein. Diversification and intensification of spring wheat systems may decrease wheat productivity, particularly when precipitation is inadequate.

Technical Abstract: Producers in the northern Plains are diversifying and intensifying traditional wheat-based cropping systems by reducing summer fallow and including legume and oilseed crops. This study examined the influence of diversification and intensification on spring wheat yield and quality, and associated insects, diseases, and weeds. Research was conducted during the 1998-2000 period in farm fields in north central Montana. Conventional rotations included either hard red spring wheat-spring barley-fallow or spring wheat-fallow. Diversified rotations included replacement of fallow with either annual pulse crops or cool-season oilseeds. Preplant soil water was less in diversified rotations, but residual nitrate was not influenced by rotation type. Insect pests and beneficial arthropods were in greater numbers in conventional rotations. Incidence and severity of crown and root rots of wheat were similar between rotation types, but foliar leaf spot diseases were greater for wheat in conventional rotations. Weed densities were not influenced by rotation type. Spring wheat yield, tiller density, and test weight were greater in conventional rotations. Spring wheat in diversified rotations had greater drought stress. Diversification and intensification of spring wheat systems may reduce pests and decrease wheat productivity, particularly when precipitation is inadequate.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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