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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE DETECTION AND CONTROL OF FOODBORNE PARASITES AND THE IMPACT ON FOOD SAFETY

Location: Animal Parasitic Diseases

Title: Epidemiological review of Toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in Romania

Authors
item Dubey, Jitender
item Ionela, Hotea -
item Olariu, Rares -
item Darabus, Gheorghe -
item Jones, Jeffery -

Submitted to: Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2013
Publication Date: March 1, 2014
Citation: Dubey, J.P., Ionela, H., Olariu, R., Darabus, G., Jones, J. 2014. Epidemiological review of Toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in Romania. Parasitology. 141:311-315.

Interpretive Summary: Toxoplasma gondii is a single-celled parasite of all warm-blooded hosts worldwide. It causes mental retardation and loss of vision in children, and abortion in livestock. Cats are the main reservoir of T. gondii because they are the only hosts that can excrete the resistant stage (oocyst) of the parasite in the feces. Humans become infected by eating under cooked meat from infected animals and food and water contaminated with oocysts Currently, there is no national survey for T. gondii infection in women in Romania and the rate of congenital infection is also unknown. Information on toxoplasmosis in animals is summarized. Currently, there is little information on genetic characteristics of T. gondii prevalence in animals and humans in Romania. This knowledge should be useful to biologists, public health workers, veterinarians, and physicians.

Technical Abstract: Infections by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are widely prevalent in humans and other animals worldwide. However, information from former East European countries, including Romania is sketchy. Unfortunately, in many Eastern European countries, including Romania it has been assumed that T. gondii is a common cause of infertility and abortion. For this reason, many women in Romania with these problems were needlessly tested for T. gondii infection. Most papers on toxoplasmosis in Romania were published in Romanian in local journals and often not available to scientists in English speaking countries. In the present paper we review prevalence, clinical spectrum, epidemiology of T. gondii in humans and animals in Romania. Based on one population-based study from central Romania, about half of the women had antibodies to T. gondii. Other serological surveys concentrated on examination of women with gynaecological problems. Currently, there is no national survey for T. gondii infection in women in Romania and the rate of congenital infection is also unknown. Information on toxoplasmosis in animals is summarized. Currently, there is little information on genetic characteristics of T. gondii prevalence in animals and humans in Romania. This knowledge should be useful to biologists, public health workers, veterinarians, and physicians.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014