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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Epidemiology and Management of Pierce's Disease and Other Maladies of Grape

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics

Title: Relationship of potato biochemical responses to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’, causal agent of zebra chip, to disease progression

Authors
item Wallis, Christopher
item Rashed, Arash -
item Wallingford, Anna
item Rush, Charles -

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 6, 2013
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Citation: Wallis, C.M., Rashed, A., Wallingford, A.K., Rush, C.M. 2013. Relationship of potato biochemical responses to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’, causal agent of zebra chip, to disease progression. American Phytopathological Society Abstracts. 103(S2):154.

Technical Abstract: Zebra chip disease is an emerging threat to potato production in the United States and elsewhere. Knowledge of how potato hosts respond to the presumptive causal agent, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (CLS), will aid with efforts to breed potatoes more tolerant to infections by this bacterium. To this end, multiple aspects of potato physiological responses to CLS were examined. Changes in host biochemistry over the course of infection, responses of different cultivars of potatoes to CLS, and differences in biochemical responses in tubers versus shoots and leaves were assessed. Host biochemical responses to CLS were consistently observed to be positively associated with zebra chip symptom severity. That is, CLS-infection resulted in greater levels of phenolic compounds, reducing sugars, and certain amino acids, which were associated with greater symptom progression over time. Therefore, one target for breeding programs should be to develop potato cultivars that do not respond to infection by major shifts in host biochemistry. These cultivars are expected to be less symptomatic than cultivars currently used in commercial production.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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