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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF GAS EMISSIONS, NUTRIENTS, AND PATHOGENS

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following swine slurry application

Authors
item Gilley, John
item Bartelt-Hunt, S -
item Lamb, Seth -
item Li, X. -
item Marx, D -
item Snow, D -
item Parker, D -
item Woodbury, Bryan

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 26, 2013
Publication Date: September 23, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57986
Citation: Gilley, J.E., Bartelt-Hunt, S.L., Lamb, S.L., Li, X., Marx, D.B., Snow, D.D., Parker, D.B., Woodbury, B.L. 2013. Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following swine slurry application. Transactions of the ASABE. 56(4):1441-1450.

Interpretive Summary: The effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient loads following swine slurry application was examined in this study. Slurry was applied to experimental plots established at a site located in southeast Nebraska. Manure treatments consisted of no manure application and manure application to meet the 1, 2, or 3 year nitrogen requirements for corn. Runoff water quality was measured during three 30 minute simulated rainfall events. The grass hedge did not significantly reduce runoff nutrient transport. Increasing nitrogen application rate from a 1 year to a 3 year corn requirement also did not result in a significant increase in nitrogen or phosphorus transport in runoff. The grass hedge significantly reduced electrical conductivity measurements and pH values. The rates of transport of nitrogen and phosphorus were significantly influenced by runoff rate. A narrow grass hedge did not significantly reduce runoff loads of nitrogen and phosphorus since most of the nutrients contained in the swine slurry infiltrated into the soil following application.

Technical Abstract: The effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient loads following swine slurry application was examined in this study. Slurry was applied to 0.75-m wide by 4.0-m long plots established on an Aksarben silty clay loam soil located in southeast Nebraska. Manure treatments consisted of no manure application and manure application to meet the 1, 2, or 3 year nitrogen (N) requirements for corn. Runoff water quality was measured during three 30 minute simulated rainfall events. The grass hedge did not significantly reduce runoff nutrient transport. Increasing N application rate from a 1 year to a 3 year corn N requirement also did not result in a significant increase in N or phosphorus (P) loads in runoff. The grass hedge significantly reduced electrical conductivity (EC) measurements from 0.78 to 0.73 dS m-1 and pH values from 8.16 to 7.85. The rates of transport of dissolved P, particulate P, and total P were each significantly influenced by runoff rate and increased in a linear fashion from 7 to 25, 65 to 357, and 72 to 382 g ha-1 min-1, respectively. Runoff rate also significantly affected rates of transport of NO3-N, NH4-N, and total nitrogen which increased in a linear fashion from 273 to 1204, 30 to 47, and 323 to 1490 g ha-1 min-1, respectively. Measurements of pH were significantly influenced by runoff rate and varied from 7.83 to 8.09. A narrow grass hedge did not significantly reduce runoff loads of N and P following swine slurry application.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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