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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Control and Prevent Disease Outbreaks Caused by Avian Influenza and Other Emerging Poultry Pathogens

Location: Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit

Title: Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

Authors
item Ramey, Andrew -
item Spackman, Erica
item Yeh, Jung-Yong -
item Fujita, Go -
item Konishi, Kan -
item Uchida, Kiyoshi -
item Reed, John -
item Wilcox, Ben -
item Brown, Justin -
item Stallknecht, David -

Submitted to: Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 17, 2013
Publication Date: September 16, 2013
Citation: Ramey, A., Spackman, E., Yeh, J., Fujita, G., Konishi, K., Uchida, K., Reed, J., Wilcox, B., Brown, J., Stallknecht, D. 2013. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan. Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research. 61(3):117-123.

Interpretive Summary: The blood of 105 migratory northern pintail ducks in Japan was tested to determine if the ducks had ever been infected with several diseases: avian influenza virus subtype H5, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. No ducks were positive for prior infection with West Nile virus and 5 ducks had evidence of prior infection with Japanese encephalitis virus. Sixty-four ducks had evidence of at one time being infected with avian influenza virus and 61 of those ducks were likely infected with an H5 subtype strain of the virus. This data only demonstrates that the ducks had been infected at one time in their lives, not that they were currently infected.

Technical Abstract: Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of economically important and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Antibodies to AIV were detected in 64 of 105 samples (61%) with 61 of the 64 positive samples inhibiting agglutination of H5 subtype AIV. Antibodies to JEV and WNV were detected in five (5%) and none of the samples, respectively. Results suggest that prior exposure to H5 AIV could influence transmission risks, disease occurrence, and viral shedding dynamics for northern pintails in East Asia and provide evidence for limited involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of flaviviruses.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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