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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPACT OF EARLY DIETARY FACTORS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Maternal metabolic changes with dietary intake of blueberry during pregnancy and lactation predispose adult progeny to lower mammary tumor growth rate

Authors
item Montales, Theresa Maria -
item Melnyk, Stephen -
item Prior, Ronald -
item Simmen, Rosalia -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2013
Publication Date: April 15, 2013
Citation: Montales, T., Melnyk, S., Prior, R.L., Simmen, R.C. 2013. Maternal metabolic changes with dietary intake of blueberry during pregnancy and lactation predispose adult progeny to lower mammary tumor growth rate [abstract]. FASEB Journal. 27(Meeting Abstracts):861.30.

Technical Abstract: We have shown lower growth rates of tumors that developed from Wnt1-transgenic (Tg) offspring of dams consuming whole blueberry powder (3% BB) during pregnancy and lactation, compared to those of control (Casein) dams. Dietary exposure at post-weaning through lifetime did not mimic the effects of early BB exposure. The basis for maternal BB effects on mammary tumor growth was examined in dams exposed to BB or control diet as young adults (beginning at age 8 weeks) and throughout pregnancy and lactation. Dams at weaning were evaluated for growth and metabolic parameters. BB-fed dams had lower abdominal and retroperitoneal fat pad weights than control-fed dams, although their body weights did not differ. BB dams also displayed increased insulin sensitivity (lower blood glucose, serum insulin, HOMA) and higher serum glutathione and methionine levels. Isolated epithelial cells from pre-neoplastic mammary tissues of Tg offspring exposed to maternal control and BB diets were analyzed for percentage of basal (CD29highCD24+) and luminal progenitor (CD29lowCD24+) populations. Maternal BB exposure (relative to control) resulted in lower percentage of the luminal subpopulation (6.4% vs 21%), which comprise the tumor bulk in Tg tissues. Results implicate the influence of the favorable metabolic and anti-oxidative maternal environment with BB diet on developing mammary glands for the improved mammary tumor outcome.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014