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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC AND GENOMIC APPROACHES TO IMPROVE PEANUT AND CORN RESISTANCE TO DISEASE AND AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION Title: Recent advances in molecular genetic linkage maps of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

Authors
item Guo, Baozhu
item Pandey, Manish -
item He, Guohao -
item Zhang, Xinyou -
item Culbreath, Albert -
item Varshney, Rajeev -
item Nwosu, Victor -
item Wilson, Richard -
item Stalker, H -

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 26, 2013
Publication Date: February 24, 2014
Citation: Guo, B., Pandey, M.K., He, G., Zhang, X., Culbreath, A., Varshney, R.K., Nwosu, V., Wilson, R.F., Stalker, H.T. 2014. Recent advances in molecular genetic linkage maps of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Peanut Science. 40:95-106.

Interpretive Summary: Lack of molecular markers, genetic linkage maps, and comparative genome sequences for peanut severely hampers peanut genetic improvement efforts. By facing these challenges, the U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) was launched at Atlanta in 2004, and then expended to a global effort at Guangzhou, China in 2006 in coordination of international efforts in genome research, molecular marker development and improvement of map resolution and coverage. The international peanut community has come a long way toward achieving the significant accomplishments in markers and genetic map development. In recent years, we have witnessed the advancement of accelerated development of genomic resources in peanut such as generation of expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) (252,832 ESTs as December 2012), development of molecular markers (over 15,518 SSRs), and construction of peanut genetic linkage maps, particular for cultivated peanut. With the development of the next generation SNP markers and whole genome sequencing completion in the near future for peanut, the “Orphan Legume Genome WHO’s Time Has Come” will soon be realized.

Technical Abstract: The competitiveness of peanuts in domestic and global markets has been threatened by losses in productivity and quality that are attributed to diseases, pests, environmental stresses and allergy or food safety issues. Narrow genetic diversity and deficiency of polymorphic DNA markers had severely hindered construction of dense genetic maps for effective genetic studies and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis to deploy linked markers in marker-assisted peanut improvement. By facing these challenges, the U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) was launched at Atlanta in 2004, and then expended to a global effort at Guangzhou, China in 2006 in coordination of international efforts in genome research, molecular marker development and improvement of map resolution and coverage. Ultimately, the peanut whole genome sequencing project was launched in 2012 by the International Peanut Genome Consortium (PGC). At this circumstance, PGC organized the symposium, “The Orphan Legume Genome WHO’S Time Has Come”, at the 44th annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society at Raleigh, NC, in July 2012. Therefore, this review is to update the recent years’ advancement of accelerated development of genomic resources in peanut such as generation of expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) (252,832 ESTs as December 2012 in the public NCBI EST database), development of molecular markers (over 15,518 SSRs), and construction of peanut genetic linkage maps, particular for cultivated peanut. Thereafter, several individual consensus genetic maps have been constructed with different numbers of markers and linkage groups (LGs). There are two very good examples of recent international efforts to develop high density maps. An international reference consensus genetic map was developed recently with 897 marker loci based on 11 published mapping populations. Furthermore, a high-density integrated consensus map of cultivated peanut and wild diploid relatives has been also developed, which was enriched further with 3693 marker loci on a single map by adding five new genetic mapping information to the published reference consensus map.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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