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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptors (PBANRs) in moths: New developments regarding alternative splice variants and the potential for targeted disruption of PBANR in pest control

Authors
item Hull, Joe
item Matsumoto, Shogo -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 19, 2012
Publication Date: June 30, 2013
Citation: Hull, J.J. and Matsumoto, S. 2013. Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptors (PBANRs) in moths: New developments regarding alternative splice variants and the potential for targeted disruption of PBANR in pest control. In Yamaguchi, M [ed], New Developments on Signal Transduction. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., Hauppauge, NY. pp. 37-77 ISBN-10: 1626182302

Interpretive Summary: For most moths, sexually mature adult females produce and release sex pheromones as a means of attracting adult males. The sex pheromones are produced in the female pheromone gland from fatty acid biosynthesis products in response to an insect neuropeptide signal termed pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). PBAN exerts its effects on sex pheromone production via a G protein-coupled receptor, termed the PBAN receptor (PBANR), expressed at the surface of pheromone-producing cells. Activation of PBANR triggers the mobilization of extracellular Ca2+, which in turn drives sex pheromone production. The molecular identity of PBANR was initially identified from Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori based on sequence similarities with the mammalian neuromedin U family of receptors. Since their initial identification, PBANRs have been identified in a number of other moth species. Functionally relevant structural variations suggested the presence of two PBANR isoforms. Recent studies, however, have shown that alternative splicing of the PBANR gene generates the variations, and that the variants are concomitantly expressed in moth pheromone glands. Given the importance of sex pheromones to moth mating behaviors, PBANR has been suggested as a potential candidate for targeted disruption. This chapter provides a brief overview of PBANR identification and the role molecular dissection of the PBANR sequence has had in elucidating critical structure-function relationships. Recent developments in generating PBANR agonists/antagonists and the potential for RNAi interference-based disruption of PBANR functionality are also discussed.

Technical Abstract: For most moths, the ability of conspecific males to locate receptive females is governed by the detection of a blend of semiochemicals known as sex pheromones. Sex pheromone components are de novo synthesized in the female pheromone gland in response to pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). The pheromonotropic effects of PBAN are mediated by a G protein-coupled receptor, termed the PBAN receptor (PBANR). Activation of PBANR, which is predominantly expressed in the pheromone gland, triggers the mobilization of extracellular Ca2+, which activates a signal transduction cascade that activates the enzymatic processes involved in sex pheromone production. Molecular identification of PBANR was initially done in Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori based on sequence similarities with the mammalian neuromedin U family of receptors. Since then PBANRs have been identified in a number of other moth species. Functionally relevant structural variations suggested the presence of two PBANR isoforms, one expressed in moths using non-cAMP dependent biosynthetic pathways and the other in cAMP dependent pathways. Recent studies, however, have shown that alternative splicing of the PBANR gene generates these variations, and that the variants are concomitantly expressed in moth pheromone glands. Given the importance of sex pheromones to moth mating behaviors, PBANR has been suggested as a potential candidate for targeted disruption. This chapter provides a brief overview of PBANR identification and the role molecular dissection of the PBANR sequence has had in elucidating critical structure-function relationships. Recent developments in generating PBANR agonists/antagonists and the potential for RNAi interference-based disruption of PBANR functionality are also discussed.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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