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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Skin total carotenoids predict plasma carotenoid levels during a 28-week experimental feeding study with varying levels of vegetables and fruit

Authors
item Jahns, Lisa
item Whigham Grendell, Leah
item Johnson, Luann -
item Mayne, Susan -
item Cartmel, Brenda -
item Ermakov, Igor -
item Gellermann, Werner -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 3, 2012
Publication Date: April 9, 2013
Citation: Jahns, L.A., Whigham Grendell, L.D., Johnson, L.K., Mayne, S.T., Cartmel, B., Ermakov, I., Gellermann, W. 2013. Skin total carotenoids predict plasma carotenoid levels during a 28-week experimental feeding study with varying levels of vegetables and fruit. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 27:230.7.

Technical Abstract: Objective biomarkers are needed to assess adherence to vegetable and fruit intervention trials. This study compared plasma carotenoid concentrations to non-invasive skin carotenoid assessments. Thirty participants consumed a low-carotenoid diet (6 wk, Phases 1 & 3), a provided diet containing 6 c/day vegetables and fruit (8 wk, Phase 2) and their usual diet (final 8 wks, Phase 4). Skin was measured 5x/wk during Phase 2 and at least 2x/wk for the duration. Plasma carotenoids were measured at baseline and mid and end of each phase. Skin and plasma carotenoid levels decreased (p<0.01) by a third from baseline to end of phase 1, then increased (p<0.01) over 300% at end of phase 2. Plasma carotenoids returned to baseline concentrations at the end of phase 3 and skin carotenoid levels by end of phase 4. At baseline, skin and plasma total carotenoid values were significantly correlated (p <0.01). Skin carotenoid status significantly predicted plasma values using a mixed linear model including all 9 time points (p < 0.001), indicating that changes in skin carotenoid status closely follow changes in plasma across a broad range of intakes. At the individual level, skin carotenoids predicted plasma values as strongly (p < 0.001). This study supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective indicator for interventions involving carotenoids or fruit/vegetable intake. Support: USDA-ARS

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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