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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Closing the energy gap through passive energy expenditure

Author
item Roemmich, James

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 2, 2012
Publication Date: April 9, 2013
Citation: Roemmich, J.N. 2013. Closing the energy gap through passive energy expenditure. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 27:236.8.

Technical Abstract: Development of obesity is a gradual process occurring when daily energy intake persistently exceeds energy expenditure (EE). Typical daily weight gain is attributed to an energy gap or excess of stored energy of 15 to 50 kcal/day. Sedentary jobs likely promote weight gain. Standing may be a passive means of increasing EE throughout the workday. The purpose of this study was to determine the EE and liking of performing clerical work while sitting and standing. EE was measured in 11 men and women while word processing for 15 min in standardized postures of sitting in a supportive office chair and while standing. Adults scored their liking of each posture and how long they would be willing to perform clerical work in each posture on a daily basis. EE was 8.8 kcal/h greater (p < 0.05) while performing clerical work while standing than while sitting in an office chair. Subjects liked sitting in an office chair more than standing (p < 0.05), but were willing to perform clerical while standing for 193+36 min/day. Given that EE while standing was 8.8 kcal/hr greater than while sitting, the median 15 to 50 kcal/day of excessive energy stored/day could be countered with ~2 to 6 hours of standing clerical work. In conclusion, standing rather than sitting in an office chair while performing clerical work increases passive energy expenditure and may help to prevent weight gain.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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