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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Vineyard Production Systems Title: X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

Authors
item Macdowell, Alastair -
item Parkinson, Dula -
item Haboub, Abdel -
item Schaible, Eric -
item Nasiatka, James -
item Yee, Chris -
item Jameson, John -
item Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan -
item Broderson, Craig -
item McElrone, Andrew

Submitted to: Proceedings of SPIE
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2012
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A user-friendly graphical user interface allows users to collect tomographic and radiographic data sets with options including tiled and time series data sets. We will focus on recent experiments made possible by our development of unique sample environments for in-situ imaging. These environments include an ultrahigh temperature tensile load frame rig which allows for the study of material failure under in situ uniaxial loading at temperatures up to 2300oC, a chamber to study water transport in living plants, and at high pressure triaxial flow cell which has allowed study of supercritical CO2 transport through brine-saturated sandstone at pressures typical of in-situ conditions for subsurface CO2 sequestration.

Technical Abstract: The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A user-friendly graphical user interface allows users to collect tomographic and radiographic data sets with options including tiled and time series data sets. We will focus on recent experiments made possible by our development of unique sample environments for in-situ imaging. These environments include an ultrahigh temperature tensile load frame rig which allows for the study of material failure under in situ uniaxial loading at temperatures up to 2300oC, a chamber to study water transport in living plants, and at high pressure triaxial flow cell which has allowed study of supercritical CO2 transport through brine-saturated sandstone at pressures typical of in-situ conditions for subsurface CO2 sequestration.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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