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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATING FORAGE SYSTEMS FOR FOOD AND ENERGY PRODUCTION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS

Location: Forage and Livestock Production Unit

Title: Notice of Release: 'Stress tolerant smooth bromegrass STSB'

Author
item Kindiger, Bryan

Submitted to: USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Cultivar Release
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: October 2, 2012
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Stress Tolerant Smooth Bromegrass (STSB) is a plant germplasm release developed by Dr. Bryan K. Kindiger at the USDA-ARS, Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK 73036. STSB will have direct benefit to the development of heat and drought tolerant smooth bromegrass cultivars in the Southern Plains and elsewhere. STSB was developed through a traditional applied stress breeding program conducted at the USDA-ARS, Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK from a bulked pool of smooth bromegrass seed collected at sites located in central Kansas, Western Missouri, Northern Oklahoma. Beginning in 1998, seeds from the collection were bulked and allowed to intercross. Seed were harvested from this population, resown and allowed to grow in a non-irrigated nursery. In 1999 and 2000, undesirable plants were removed from the nursery. In 2001, surviving plants were allowed to cross-pollinate and seed was again harvested. The selection of undesirable plants followed by cross-pollination was repeated for 4 additional cycles. This two year pattern of recurrent selection continued for five cycles, ending in 2008. Seed for testing were bulked from the surviving plants. STSB exhibits exceptional tolerance to heat, drought and low nitrogen inputs. The STSB plant material represents a useful for grazing grass forage for grazing livestock in dryland regions of the southern plains region of the USA. The germplasm may also have application in the dryland, non-irrigated regions of the central region of the USA. It may be useful as a germplasm resource for developing future smooth bromegrass cultivars, or be useful as a cultivar on its own. Material of this release has been deposited in the USDA National Plant Germplasm System (http://www.ars grin.gov/npgs/) where it will be available for research purposes, including development and commercialization of new cultivars.

Technical Abstract: The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture announces the release of a stress tolerant smooth bromegrass (STSB) [Bromus inermys, Leyss.] germplasm (PI xxxx) developed by Dr. Bryan K. Kindiger at the USDA-ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK 73036. STSB is released by the USDA-ARS in 2012 to promote the utilization of heat, drought and low nitrogen tolerant cool-season, perennial grass forage for use as a haying or grazing in the Southern Plains Region of the USA or elsewhere. STSB will have benefit to the development of new heat and drought tolerant smooth bromegrass cultivars or can be utilized as a cultivar on its own. STSB was developed through a recurrent selection program conducted at the USDA-ARS, Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK from a bulked pool of bromus inermis seed collected at sites located in central Kansas, Western Missouri, Northern Oklahoma. Beginning in 1998, seeds from the collection were bulked and allowed to intercross. Seed were harvested from this population, resown and allowed to grow in a non-irrigated nursery. In 1999 and 2000, undesirable plants were removed from the nursery. In 2001, surviving plants were allowed to cross-pollinate and seed was again harvested. The selection of undesirable plants followed by cross-pollination was repeated for 4 additional cycles. This two year pattern of recurrent selection continued for five cycles, ending in 2008. During this selection cycle, a low nitrogen application rate of 44.8 kg/ha was maintained to provide an additional level of stress to the plant material. Seed for testing were bulked from the surviving plants. Seed of STSB have been deposited in the USDA National Plant Germplasm System (http://www.ars grin.gov/npgs/) where it will be available for research purposes, including development and commercialization of new cultivars. It is requested that appropriate recognition be made if these genetic stocks contribute to research or the development of a new breeding line or cultivar.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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