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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HARD WINTER WHEAT QUALITY FOR END-USE QUALITY

Location: Grain Quality and Structure Research Unit

Title: Can protein levels be economically increased?

Authors
item Arnall, D -
item Mullock, Jeremiah -
item Seabourn, Bradford

Submitted to: Fluid Journal
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2012
Publication Date: May 1, 2012
Citation: Arnall, D.B., Mullock, J. and Seabourn, B.W. 2012. Can protein levels be economically increased?. Fluid Journal. 20(3):2-5.

Interpretive Summary: Trial studies were conducted on hard red winter wheat at two different Oklahoma locations. Across both locations, no evident trends in grain yields developed, but trends were found in grain protein results. Low protein values were reported. Reasons for the low protein include lack of response in yield due to late-season applications of nitrogen and extreme heat and drought during the spring and summer. These environmental conditions may have drawn soil moisture from greater depth, subsequently contributing to higher nitrate level in the plant during periods of stem elongation through grain fill. As is often the case in field experiments, no final conclusions were drawn from a single year of data collection.

Technical Abstract: One result from the 2010 hard red winter wheat harvest was an increase of discussions on protein values across the southern great plains. The crop garnered relatively low protein values for several reasons, many of which were directly related to the weather patterns and environmental conditions. The question that many in industry and production were asking was whether protein levels could be economically increased. Trial studies were done at two different Oklahoma locations. Across both locations, no evident trends in grain yields developed, but trends were found in grain protein results. Lack of response in yield due to late-season applications of N is not unexpected, especially considering the environment. Extreme heat and drought during the spring and summer drew soil moisture from depth, likely contributing a great deal of additional nitrate during periods of stem elongation through grain fill. As is often the case in field experiments, no final conclusions can be drawn from a single year's worth of data.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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