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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC TOOLS TO STUDY RUMINANT RESISTANCE TO GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODES

Location: Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory

Title: Metagenomic sequences of host associated gut microbiome in response to helminth infections.

Author
item Li, Robert

Submitted to: Metagenomics Analysis Server, MG-RAST
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: June 27, 2012
Publication Date: June 30, 2012
Citation: Li, R.W. 2012. Metagenomic sequences of host associated gut microbiome in response to helminth infections.. Metagenomics Analysis Server, MG-RAST. 4474250.3.

Technical Abstract: Helminth infection in pigs serves as an excellent model for the study of the interaction between human malnutrition and parasitic infection and could have important implications in human health. We had observed that pigs infected with Trichuris suis for 21 days showed significant changes in the proximal colon microbiota. In this study, interactions between worm burden and severity of disruptions to the microbial composition and metabolic potentials in the porcine proximal colon microbiota were investigated using metagenomic tools. Pigs were infected by a single dose of T. suis eggs for 53 days. Among infected pigs, two cohorts were differentiated that either had adult worms or were worm-free. Infection resulted in a significant change in the abundance of approximately 13% of genera detected in the proximal colon microbiota regardless of worm status, suggesting a relatively persistent change over time in the microbiota due to the initial infection. A significant reduction in the abundance of Fibrobacter and Ruminococcus indicated a change in the fibrolytic capacity of the colon microbiota in T. suis infected pigs. In addition, ~10% of identified KEGG pathways were affected by infection, including ABC transporters, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis as well as a-linolenic acid metabolism. Trichuris suis infection modulated host immunity to Campylobacter because there was a 3-fold increase in the relative abundance in the colon microbiota of infected pigs with worms compared to naïve controls, but a 3-fold reduction in worm-free infected pigs compared to controls. The level of pathology observed in infected pigs with worms compared to worm-free infected pigs may relate to the local host response because expression of several Th2-related genes were enhanced in infected pigs with worms versus those worm-free. Our findings provided insight into the dynamics of the proximal colon microbiota in pigs in response to T. suis infection.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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