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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOP MANAGEMENT TOOLS FOR EARLY STRESS DETECTION AND EFFICIENT AGROCHEMICAL UTILIZATION FOR PROTECTED HORTICULTURE CROPS

Location: Application Technology Research Unit

Title: Nutrient disorders of 'Evolution' mealy-cup sage

Authors
item Barnes, Jared -
item Whipker, Brian -
item Mccall, Ingram -
item Frantz, Jonathan

Submitted to: HortTechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2012
Publication Date: August 1, 2012
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56415
Citation: Barnes, J., Whipker, B., McCall, I., Frantz, J. 2012. Nutrient disorders of 'Evolution' mealy-cup sage. HortTechnology. 22(4):502-508.

Interpretive Summary: To produce popular floriculture crops, growers must be equipped with cultural information including the ability to recognize and characterize disorders. Diagnostic criteria of nutrient disorders of the plant mealy-cup sage are absent from the literature. Therefore, mealy-cup sage plants were grown in sand culture to induce, describe, and photograph symptoms of nutritional disorders. Control plants received a complete fertilizer solution while nutrient-deficient treatments were induced with a complete nutrient formula minus one of the nutrients. Boron toxicity was induced by increasing the element tenfold higher than the complete nutrient formula. We monitored plants daily to document and photograph sequential series of symptoms as they developed. Out of thirteen nutrient treatments, twelve exhibited symptoms; molybdenum did not have any symptoms. Symptoms of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, calcium, and potassium deficiencies and boron toxicity manifested early; therefore, these disorders may be more likely problems encountered by growers. Unique symptoms were observed on plants grown in nitrogen-, copper-, and zinc-deficient conditions. Small dead spots on leaves was a common symptom observed, but use of other descriptions about the location and progression of the disorder can aid growers in diagnosing nutrient disorders of mealy-cup sage.

Technical Abstract: To produce popular floriculture crops like mealy-cup sage (Salvia farinacea (Benth.)), growers must be equipped with cultural information including the ability to recognize and characterize disorders. Diagnostic criteria of nutrient disorders of mealy-cup sage are absent from the literature. Therefore, ‘Evolution’ mealy-cup sage plants were grown in silica-sand culture to induce, describe, and photograph symptoms of nutritional disorders. Plants received a complete modified Hoagland's all-nitrate solution of (macronutrient concentrations in mM) 15 NO3-, 1.0 H2PO4-, 6.0 K+, 5.0 Ca2+, 2.0 Mg2+, and 2.0 SO42- plus (micronutrient concentrations in micromolar) 72 Fe2+, 18 Mn2+, 3.0 Cu2+, 3.0 Zn2+, 45 BO33-, and 0.1 MoO42-. Nutrient-deficient treatments were induced with a complete nutrient formula minus one of the nutrients. Boron toxicity was induced by increasing the element tenfold higher than the complete nutrient formula. Reagent-grade chemicals and deionized water of 18 million ohm·cm-1 purity were used to formulate treatment solutions. We monitored plants daily to document and photograph sequential series of symptoms as they developed. Typical symptomology of nutrient disorders and critical tissue concentrations are presented. Out of thirteen treatments, twelve exhibited symptomology; molybdenum was asymptomatic. Symptoms of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, calcium, and potassium deficiencies and boron toxicity manifested early; therefore, these disorders may be more likely problems encountered by growers. Unique symptoms were observed on plants grown in nitrogen-, copper-, and zinc-deficient conditions. Necrosis was a common symptom observed, but use of other diagnostic criteria about location and progression of the disorder can aid growers in diagnosing nutrient disorders of mealy-cup sage, making this popular ornamental crop easier to grow and correct disorders when they occur.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014