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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bio-Energy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks & Sustain Soil Productivity...

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Marshner Review: Harnessing the rhizosphere microbiome through plant breeding and agricultural management

Authors
item Bakker, Matthew -
item Manter, Daniel
item Sheflin, Amy -
item Weir, Tiffany -
item Vivanco, Jorge -

Submitted to: Plant and Soil
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 2, 2012
Publication Date: August 31, 2012
Citation: Bakker, M., Manter, D.K., Sheflin, A., Weir, T., Vivanco, J. 2012. Marshner Review: Harnessing the rhizosphere microbiome through plant breeding and agricultural management. Plant and Soil. DOI: 10.1007/s1104-012-1361-x.

Interpretive Summary: The need to enhance the sustainability of intensive agricultural systems is widely recognized. One promising approach is to encourage beneficial functions provided by microorganisms to decrease the inputs of fertilizers and pesticides. However, tremendous uncertainty exists in how this might be best accomplished. We highlight connections between plants and the rhizosphere microbiome and discuss the possibility of using plants as selective agents to enhance beneficial microbial activities and microbiome characteristics. We highlight gaps in our understanding and areas of research that are vital to our ability to more fully exploit the soil microbiome for agroecosystem productivity and sustainability.

Technical Abstract: The need to enhance the sustainability of intensive agricultural systems is widely recognized. One promising approach is to encourage beneficial functions provided by microorganisms to decrease the inputs of fertilizers and pesticides. However, tremendous uncertainty exists in how this might be best accomplished. We highlight connections between plants and the rhizosphere microbiome and discuss the possibility of using plants as selective agents to enhance beneficial microbial activities and microbiome characteristics. We highlight gaps in our understanding and areas of research that are vital to our ability to more fully exploit the soil microbiome for agroecosystem productivity and sustainability.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014