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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF LAND AND WATER RESOURCES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY IN THE NORTHEAST U.S.

Location: Pasture Systems & Watershed Management Research

Title: Managing manure for sustainable livestock production in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Authors
item KLEINMAN, PETER
item Saacke Blunk, Kristen -
item BRYANT, RAY
item SAPORITO, LOUIS
item Beegle, Doug -
item Czymmek, Karl -
item Ketterings, Quirine -
item Sims, Tom -
item Shortle, Jim -
item Mcgrath, Josh -
item Coale, Frank -
item Dubin, Mark -
item Dostie, Daniel -
item Maguire, Rory -
item Meinen, Robb -
item Allen, Arthur -
item O'Neill, Kelly -
item Garber, Lamonte -
item Davis, Mark -
item Clark, Bobby -
item Sellner, Kevin -
item SMITH, MATT

Submitted to: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 20, 2012
Publication Date: March 1, 2012
Citation: Kleinman, P., Saacke Blunk, K., Bryant, R.B., Saporito, L.S., Beegle, D., Czymmek, K., Ketterings, Q., Sims, T., Shortle, J., Mcgrath, J., Coale, F., Dubin, M., Dostie, D., Maguire, R., Meinen, R., Allen, A., O'Neill, K., Garber, L., Davis, M., Clark, B., Sellner, K., Smith, M.C. 2012. Managing manure for sustainable livestock production in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation. 67:54A-61A. DOI: 10.2489/jswc.67.2.54A.

Interpretive Summary: Manure presents one of the greatest challenges to livestock operations in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The root causes of today’s manure management concerns range from on-farm practices, to historical factors, to market forces and food production system design. We review the landscape of manure management issues found in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and highlight priorities.

Technical Abstract: Manure presents one of the greatest challenges to livestock operations in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Chesapeake Bay is threatened by excessive nutrient loadings and, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, manure is the source of 18% of the nitrogen and 27% of the phosphorus entering the Bay annually. It is well recognized that programs aimed at improving the health of the Bay must address manure as a source and manure management as a solution. We review the diversity of manure management concerns found in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, highlighting priority concerns and, where possible, identifying remedial actions. As the root causes of today’s manure management concerns range from on-farm practices, to historical factors, to market forces and food production system design, sustainable management of manure requires a holistic approach that includes both short- and long-term objectives.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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