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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DOCUMENTATION OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Collection and seed production of Allium acuminatum

Authors
item Hellier, Barbara
item Johnson, Richard

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 27, 2011
Publication Date: October 16, 2011
Citation: Hellier, B.C., Johnson, R.C. 2011. Collection and seed production of Allium acuminatum. Meeting Abstract. Crop Science Society of America meeting, 10/15-10/19/2011 San Antonio TX.

Interpretive Summary: As a component of Greater Sage-Grouse and Southern Idaho Ground Squirrel habitat, Allium acuminatum Hook. (Taper-tip onion) has been targeted for use in restoration projects and conservation. Before a native plant can be used in large or small projects in the landscape quantities of propagules need to be available. Minimal information exists on the cultural needs of Taper-tip onion for seed production in an agricultural setting. Either dormant bulbs or true seed may be viable options for Taper-tip onion stand establishment. For either type of propagule, quantities of true seed will be needed. Bulbs of Taper-tip onion were collected from native populations in northern Nevada, southern Idaho and Oregon. To determine initial cultural parameters for seed production, bulked samples of the collected bulbs were used in a randomized trial examining the effect of planting method (hand or mechanical) and within-row bulb spacing (2.5 or 5 cm) on seed production. Our results showed that mechanically planting mature bulbs of Taper-tip onion is an efficient planting method for seed and bulb production. Bulbs can be spaced 2.5 cm apart for maximum seed production but a wider between bulb spacing is needed for larger diameter bulb (7-15mm) production. Seed shattering will need to be minimized at harvest, but bulb survival and propagule production was achieved in an agricultural setting for this wild species.

Technical Abstract: As a component of Greater Sage-Grouse and Southern Idaho Ground Squirrel habitat, Allium acuminatum Hook. (Taper-tip onion) has been targeted for use in restoration projects and conservation. Before a native plant can be used in large or small projects in the landscape quantities of propagules need to be available. Minimal information exists on the cultural needs of Taper-tip onion for seed production in an agricultural setting. Either dormant bulbs or true seed may be viable options for Taper-tip onion stand establishment. For either type of propagule, quantities of true seed will be needed. Bulbs of Taper-tip onion were collected from native populations in northern Nevada, southern Idaho and Oregon. To determine initial cultural parameters for seed production, bulked samples of the collected bulbs were used in a randomized trial examining the effect of planting method (hand or mechanical) and within-row bulb spacing (2.5 or 5 cm) on seed production. Our results showed that mechanically planting mature bulbs of Taper-tip onion is an efficient planting method for seed and bulb production. Bulbs can be spaced 2.5 cm apart for maximum seed production but a wider between bulb spacing is needed for larger diameter bulb (7-15mm) production. Seed shattering will need to be minimized at harvest, but bulb survival and propagule production was achieved in an agricultural setting for this wild species.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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