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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING PATHOGEN DETECTION AND CROP PROTECTION IN SUGARBEET USING MOLECULAR TECHNOLOGIES

Location: Sugarbeet and Potato Research

Title: Impact of the soybean cyst nematode on seedling diseases of sugarbeet

Authors
item Rudolph, Kurt -
item Nelson, Berlin -
item Bolton, Melvin

Submitted to: Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 30, 2012
Publication Date: February 6, 2012
Citation: Rudolph, K., Nelson, B., Bolton, M.D. 2012. Impact of the soybean cyst nematode on seedling diseases of sugarbeet. 2011 Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports. 42:199-201.

Interpretive Summary: Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is now well established in the southern Red River Valley of North Dakota and Minnesota. When sugarbeet is planted into SCN-infested soil, the nematode may attempt to penetrate and colonize sugarbeet roots. Although SCN cannot cause disease in sugarbeet, such penetration attempts are likely to create lesions on the root surface. Since wounding of the sugarbeet root is known to increase disease severity for several sugarbeet diseases, the lesions from SCN might offer entry points for several sugarbeet pathogens. We measured the amount of SCN present in two sugarbeet cultivars grown under field conditions. We found that SCN readily infects sugarbeet roots regardless of the cultivar is sugar beet cyst nematode resistant or susceptible. In greenhouse studies, we found that plants about two weeks old were the most susceptible to SCN penetration. This time point was utilized to assess whether pre-infection by SCN would increase susceptibility to Rhizoctonia solani, an important sugarbeet pathogen. We found that SCN increases disease by at least 10% in two of three experimental repeats in the study.

Technical Abstract: Soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) has recently moved into the southern Red River Valley of North Dakota and Minnesota. When sugarbeet is planted into SCN-infested soil, the nematode may attempt to penetrate and establish itself in the sugarbeet roots. Such penetration attempts are likely to create lesions on the root surface. Since wounding of the sugarbeet root is known to increase disease severity for several sugarbeet diseases, the lesions from SCN might offer entry points for several sugarbeet pathogens. We used semi-quantitative PCR to show that SCN is present in sugar beet grown under field conditions. In addition, SCN was able to infect a sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN) resistant cultivar equally as well as a SBCN susceptible cultivar under field conditions. In greenhouse studies, we found that plants two weeks post emergence were the most susceptible to SCN penetration. This time point was utilized to assess whether pre-infection by SCN would increase susceptibility to Rhizoctonia solani, an important sugarbeet pathogen. We found that SCN increases root necrosis by at least 10% in two of three experimental repeats in the study.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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