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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Modulation of Immune Function and Oxidative Stress

Location: Immunity and Disease Prevention Research Unit

Title: Impact of daily feeding of carotenoid-rich foods on plasma carotenoid and vitamin A concentrations in lactating women with marginal vitamin A status [abstract]

Authors
item Turner, Tami -
item Burri, Betty
item Haskell, Marjorie -
item Jamil, Kazi -
item Jamil, Maleka -

Submitted to: Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2012
Publication Date: April 21, 2012
Citation: Turner, T., Burri, B.J., Haskell, M., Jamil, K., Jamil, M. 2012. Impact of daily feeding of carotenoid-rich foods on plasma carotenoid and vitamin A concentrations in lactating women with marginal vitamin A status [abstract]. Experimental Biology. A27.5.

Technical Abstract: Vitamin A (VA) is necessary for normal growth, development, immune function, and vision. Carotenoids such as ß-carotene (BC) and ß-cryptoxanthin (CX) can be converted to VA and are often the major source of VA in the diets of people from developing countries. Our clinical trial is assessing the impact of a dietary intervention with foods rich in CX and BC on plasma and breast milk concentrations of VA, BC, and CX. We randomly assigned breastfeeding women to receive a VA supplement (0.5 mg), tangerines (6 mg CX), orange sweet potatoes (12 mg BC), or white potatoes (0 mg RE) in divided doses 6 days a week for three weeks. Concentrations of VA, BC, and CX are measured in plasma and breast milk at baseline and at 3 weeks. We report the responses of VA, BC and CX in plasma herein. Baseline concentrations of analytes were not different. Changes in BC and CX were significantly higher in plasma in the respective treatments groups receiving BC (p<0.005) and CX (p<0.001). Changes in plasma VA was higher in the BC group and the VA supplement group; however, as anticipated, after controlling for initial retinol values only the group receiving the VA supplements was statistically different than the control group (p<0.001). As plasma VA is homeostatically controlled, we expect that VA in breast milk will provide a better indicator of changes in VA status from treatment and therefore give information of the bioefficacy of the conversion of BC and CX to VA in humans. Supported by AFRI/NIFA Grant 2008-01889.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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