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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURALLY IMPORTANT ORGANISMS Title: Development and characterization of sixteen microsatellite loci for Geosmithia morbida, the causal agent of thousand canker disease in black walnut (Juglans nigra)

Authors
item Hadziabdic, Denita -
item Wadl, Phillip -
item Vito, Lisa -
item Boggess, Sarah -
item Scheffler, Brian
item Windham, Mark -
item Trigiano, Robert -

Submitted to: Conservation Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 5, 2011
Publication Date: September 21, 2011
Citation: Hadziabdic, D., Wadl, P.A., Boggess, S.L., Scheffler, B.E., Windham, M.T., Trigiano, R.N. 2011. Development and characterization of sixteen microsatellite loci for Geosmithia morbida, the causal agent of thousand canker disease in black walnut (Juglans nigra). Conservation Genetics. 4(2):287-289.

Interpretive Summary: DNA markers can be utilized as a useful tool to identify and characterize collections of many organisms. This is especially true for pathogens where it can be difficult and time consuming to characterize different isolates. In this study, DNA markers were developed for the pathogen that causes canker disease in black walnut. The species associated with this disease is Geosmithia morbid. A total of 77 DNA markers (based on simple sequence repeats) were developed and characterized. Of these, 16 were deemed to be useful for broader studies to check their possible utilization as rapid disease diagnostic markers, for populations and epidemiology studies.

Technical Abstract: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were identified from the fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida. Loci were characterized for 13 different isolates collected in 2010 from symptomatic black walnut trees in Tennessee. A total of 77 loci were tested and 16 of those were optimized, screened and selected for diversity studies of G. morbida. Number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 8. These microsatellite loci will be useful for rapid disease diagnostic, population genetic analyses on a global scale as well as further epidemiological studies of G. morbida.

Last Modified: 12/28/2014
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