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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY, BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF NATURAL ENEMIES OF INSECT PESTS OF CROP AND URBAN AND NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS Title: Tracing the origin of US brown marmorated stink bugs, Halyomorpha halys

Authors
item Xu, Jiawu -
item Fonseca, Dina -
item Hamilton, George -
item Hoelmer, Kim
item Nielson, Anne -

Submitted to: Biological Invasions
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 7, 2013
Publication Date: July 17, 2013
Citation: Xu, J., Fonseca, D.M., Hamilton, G.C., Hoelmer, K.A., Nielson, A.L. 2013. Tracing the origin of US brown marmorated stink bugs, Halyomorpha halys. Biological Invasions. (2014) 16:153-166 DOI 10.1007/s10530-013-0510-3.

Interpretive Summary: In its native range of Korea, China, and Japan, the brown marmorated stink bug is a minor and sporadic pest of various tree fruits and soybeans. Since it was accidentally introduced into the eastern United States in the mid 1990’s, tree fruit, vegetable and field crop growers in this region have experienced very high levels of damage from this invasive species. We analyzed two population genetic markers in stink bug specimens to compare the levels of genetic variability present in brown marmorated stink bug populations in the US and Asia. Asian populations were found to be highly diverse, while the US populations lacked such genetic diversity and were very similar to each other. The results support the idea of a single introduction of a small number of brown marmorated stink bugs in the eastern U.S.

Technical Abstract: In its native range of Korea, China, and Japan, the pentatomid Halyomorpha halys is a minor, sporadic pest of tree fruit and soybeans. It was accidentally introduced into the eastern United States in the mid 1990’s and tree fruit, vegetable and field crop growers in this region now experience very high levels of damage by this invasive stink bug. Using two highly variable mitochondrial DNA loci, the cytochrome oxidase I and II (COI and COII) in specimens from specimens obtained from early populations of H. halys in the USA as well as from specimens collected from various sites in Japan, the Republic of Korea, and China were examined to determine the relative levels of genetic heterozygosity of H. halys in the USA compared to populations in its native range. We found a considerable amount of genetic diversity in Asian populations of H. halys at the two mitochondrial loci examined across its native range. In contrast, the US samples displayed homogeneity across the entire range of the introduced populations (at least 10 years after its first discovery in Allentown, PA), which leads us to hypothesize a single introduction of a very small number of specimens. No evidence of the presence of endosymbiotic Wolbachia was found in any of the specimens of H. halys tested.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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