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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF LEPIDOPTERA: INVASIVE SPECIES, PESTS, AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: The moths of America, north of Mexico, Tortricidae, Tortricinae (part), Sparganothini and Atteriini

Authors
item Brown, John
item Powell, J. -
item Kruse, J. -

Submitted to: Moths of North America
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 28, 2011
Publication Date: June 8, 2012
Repository URL: http://www.wedgefoundation.org
Citation: Brown, J.W., Powell, J.A., Kruse, J.J. 2012. The moths of America, north of Mexico, Tortricidae, Tortricinae (part), Sparganothini and Atteriini. In: Hodges, R.W., editor. Moths of North America, fascicle 8.1. Washington, D.C.: Wedge Entomological Research Foundation. p. 230

Interpretive Summary: Larvae of the moth family commonly known as leaf-rollers feed on a wide array of plant families. Many species cause significant economic damage by feeding on crops, on ornamentals and landscaping, and on forest trees (mainly conifers). This paper reviews the entire North American fauna (north of Mexico) of two major groups referred to as tribes (13 genera and 84 species), synthesizing all previously published information, providing identification keys and illustrations to many anatomical features, and describing as new to science 21 species that previously were unrecognized. This information will be valuable to a variety of stakeholders, especially those involved in pest management in avocado and apple orchards and in greenhouse settings, as well as scientists interested in the biodiversity of North America, ecologists studying host plant associations of caterpillars and native plants, and amateur moth collectors.

Technical Abstract: The North American members of the tortricid tribes Sparganothini and Atteriini are revised. Eighty-three species in 12 genera are included in Sparganothini; only a single representative of Atteriini reaches the region north of Mexico. Twenty-one new species are proposed: Amorbia vero Powell & Brown (USA, Florida); Coelosthama placidana Powell & Brown (USA, Florida); Sparganothis robinsonana Powell & Brown (USA, Texas); Sparganothis tessellata Powell & Brown (USA, Alabama); Sparganothis minimetallica Powell & Brown (USA, Florida); Sparganothis boweri Powell & Brown (USA, Wisconsin); Sparganothis sullivani Powell & Brown (USA, North Carolina); Sparganothis lindalinea Powell & Brown (USA, Mississippi); Sparganothis mcguinnessi Powell & Brown (USA, New York); Sparganothis niteolinea Powell & Brown (USA, Florida); Sparganothis azulispecca Powell & Brown (USA, Alabama); Sparganothis richersi Powell & Brown (USA, Arizona); Cenopis unicolorana Powell & Brown (USA, Alabama); Cenopis eulongicosta Powell & Brown (USA, New Jersey); Cenopis vabroui Powell & Brown (USA, Louisiana); Platynota polingi Powell & Brown (USA, Arizona); Platynota texana Powell & Brown (USA, Texas); Platynota islameconae Powell & Brown (USA, California); Platynota blanchardi Powell & Brown (USA, Texas); Platynota zapatana Powell & Brown (USA, Texas); and Platynota redingtonensis Powell & Brown (USA, Arizona). Keys to the adults of all genera and species are included. Adults of all species are illustrated in color, and male and female genitalia of all species are illustrated by line drawings or images.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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