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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF SWALLOW-WORTS, INVASIVE WEEDS OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

Location: Biological Integrated Pest Management Unit

Title: Development and reproduction of the foxglove aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

Authors
item Milbrath, Lindsey
item Biazzo, Jeromy

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2011
Publication Date: June 11, 2012
Citation: Milbrath, L.R., Biazzo, J. 2012. Development and reproduction of the foxglove aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.). Environmental Entomology. 41:665-668. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/EN11239.

Interpretive Summary: The foxglove aphid is found worldwide and feeds on a very large number of plant species, including many economically important plants such as potato, lettuce, and ornamental species. Many weeds also serve as hosts in the summer, but little information exists as to the suitability of these species as hosts. The foxglove aphid was recently collected from two invasive species in New York State - pale and black swallow-wort. These plants are nonnative, perennial milkweed vines that have invaded various natural and managed habitats in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. We studied the development and reproduction of foxglove aphid on pale and black swallow-wort relative to potatoes. There were no differences in aphid development, survival, or reproduction among the three species. Pale and black swallow-wort appear to be suitable hosts for foxglove aphid; other factors apparently limit aphid abundance on these two plant species in the field. This information is useful for contolling foxglove aphid.

Technical Abstract: The foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach), was recently documented utilizing the invasive species pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. and V. nigrum (L.) Moench, respectively) as host plants. Because these are new host plant records for this polyphagous species, we investigated foxglove aphid development and reproduction on pale and black swallow-wort relative to a known crop host, potato, at a 25:20 deg C thermophase and a 16:8 hr (L:D) photoperiod. Almost no such data have been previously reported for a non-economic host plant. Larval development and survival, as well as adult reproductive development and fecundity, were similar between the two swallow-wort species and potato. Adult aphids lived significantly longer on pale swallow-wort than the other two host plants, but this extended longevity encompassed the post-reproductive stage. Foxglove aphid population parameters were therefore similar among the three plant species as well as most previous reports on crop plants. Pale and black swallow-wort appear to be suitable secondary hosts for foxglove aphid; other factors apparently limit aphid abundance on these two plant species in the field.

Last Modified: 12/24/2014
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