Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bio-Energy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks & Sustain Soil Productivity...

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Lignocellulose decomposition by microbial secretions

Authors
item Santhanam, Navaneetha -
item Badri, Dayakr -
item Decker, Stephen -
item Manter, Daniel
item Reardon, Kenneth -
item Vivanco, Jorge -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2011
Publication Date: January 19, 2012
Citation: Santhanam, N., Badri, D., Decker, S., Manter, D.K., Reardon, K., Vivanco, J. 2012. Lignocellulose Decomposition by Microbial Secretions. In: Baluska, F. and Vivance, J.M. editors. Secretions and Exudates in Biological Systems. Springer, NY. pp. 125-153.

Interpretive Summary: Carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems depends upon the natural resistance of plant material to rapid biological degradation. Microorganisms have evolved remarkable means to overcome this natural resistance. Lignocellulose decomposition by microorganisms comprises an essential step in closing the loop of the global carbon cycle as they degrade and recycle this carbon pool. The significance of microbial decomposition of lignocellulose has recently risen to greater heights with the revisitation of the potential of lignocellulosic biomass as a valuable and abundant feedstock for the renewable energy and bioproducts industry. The scope of this chapter is to succinctly touch upon the composition of lignocellulosic biomass, the major enzymes involved in decomposing lignocellulosic biomass, and the fungi and bacteria that secrete these enzymes.

Technical Abstract: Carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems is contingent upon the natural resistance of plant cell wall polymers to rapid biological degradation. Nevertheless, certain microorganisms have evolved remarkable means to overcome this natural resistance. Lignocellulose decomposition by microorganisms comprises an essential step in closing the loop of the global carbon cycle as it facilitates the recycling of carbon reposited in the form of structural polymers in plant cell walls. The significance of microbial decomposition of lignocellulose has recently risen to greater heights with the revisitation of the potential of lignocellulosic biomass as a valuable and abundant feedstock for the renewable energy and bioproducts industry. The scope of this chapter is to succinctly touch upon the composition of lignocellulosic biomass, the major enzymes involved in decomposing lignocellulosic biomass, and the fungi and bacteria that secrete these enzymes.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page