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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository (Corvallis, Oregon)

Title: Emerging fruit crops

Authors
item HUMMER, KIM
item Pomper, Kirk -
item POSTMAN, JOSEPH
item Graham, Charles -
item STOVER, ED
item Mercure, Eric -
item ARADHYA, MALLIKARJUNA
item Crisosto, Carlos -
item Ferguson, Louise -
item Thompson, Maxine -
item Byers, Patrick -
item Zee, Francis

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 13, 2011
Publication Date: March 1, 2012
Citation: Hummer, K.E., Pomper, K., Postman, J.D., Graham, C.J., Stover, E.W., Mercure, E.W., Aradhya, M.K., Crisosto, C.H., Ferguson, L., Thompson, M., Byers, P., Zee, F.T. 2012. Emerging fruit crops. Book Chapter. p. 97-147.

Interpretive Summary: Hundreds of fruit species with commercial potential are currently in a status of low economic importance. Some, such as quince, pomegranate, and figs, have been cultivated for thousands of years. Others have only been locally collected and consumed from wild populations of the fruit. Their development of these underappreciated crops depends on a range of factors including the cultivation limitations, yields, uses of the fruit, and marketing potential. Although initially many crops are developed using selections from the wild, as they are developed, breeding programs work towards improving the crop for both production and quality. This chapter examines nine emerging crops chosen among hundreds of potential crops which are currently showing much promise as commercial crops. These include five tree fruits: pawpaw, quince, mayhaw, pomegranate, and fig; and four berry crops: blue honeysuckle, elder, goji, and ohelo.

Technical Abstract: Hundreds of fruit species with commercial potential are currently in a status of low economic importance. Some, such as quince (Cydonia oblonga L.), pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), and figs (Ficus carica L.) , have been cultivated for thousands of years. Others have only been locally collected and consumed from wild populations of the fruit. Their development of these underappreciated crops depends on a range of factors including the cultivation limitations, yields, uses of the fruit, and marketing potential. Although initially many crops are developed using selections from the wild, as they are developed, breeding programs work towards improving the crop for both production and quality. This chapter examines nine emerging crops chosen among hundreds of potential crops which are currently showing much promise as commercial crops. These include five tree fruits: pawpaw(Asimina triloba L.), quince, mayhaw (Cragaegus sp.), pomegranate, and fig; and four berry crops: blue honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea L), elder (Sambucus nigra L.), goji (Lycium barbarum L., and ohelo (Vaccinium reticulatum and V. calycinum).

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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