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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NUTRITION, OBESITY, CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AND GENOMICS

Location: Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Title: Association of vitamin B-6 status with inflammation, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory conditions: the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

Authors
item Shen, Jian -
item Lai, Chao Qiang
item Mattei, Josiemer -
item Ordovas, Jose -
item Tucker, Katherine -

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 6, 2009
Publication Date: February 1, 2010
Citation: Shen, J., Lai, C., Mattei, J., Ordovas, J.M., Tucker, K.L. 2010. Association of vitamin B-6 status with inflammation, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory conditions: the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 91(2):337-342.

Interpretive Summary: Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin and is part of the vitamin B complex group. Several forms of the vitamin are known, but pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) is the active form and is a cofactor in many reactions of amino acid metabolism, including transamination, deamination, and decarboxylation. PLP also is necessary for the enzymatic reaction governing the release of glucose from glycogen. Low vitamin B6 status has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to examine the association of vitamin B-6 status with markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. We used for this purpose Puerto Rican adults who were living in Massachusetts (n = 1205).strong dose-response relation of plasma PLP concentration. Our data show that low vitamin B6 concentrations are associated with inflammation, higher oxidative stress, and metabolic conditions in older Puerto Rican adults. Therefore, we conclude that vitamin B6 may influence cardiovascular disease risk and support the notion that nutritional status may influence the health disparities present in this population.

Technical Abstract: Background: Low vitamin B-6 status has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The cardioprotective effects of vitamin B-6 independent of homocysteine suggest that additional mechanisms may be involved. Objective: Our objective was to examine the cross-sectional association of vitamin B-6 status with markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Design: We measured plasma pyridoxal-5#-phosphate (PLP), Creactive protein (CRP), and an oxidative DNA damage marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in Puerto Rican adults who were living in Massachusetts (n = 1205, aged 45–75 y). Results: There was a strong dose-response relation of plasma PLP concentration with plasma CRP. Increasing quartiles of PLP were significantly associated with lower CRP concentrations (geometric means: 4.7, 3.6, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/L; P for trend , 0.0001) and with lower urinary 8-OHdG concentrations (geometric means: 124, 124, 117, and 108 ng/mg creatinine; P for trend: 0.025) after multivariate adjustment. These negative associations persisted after plasma homocysteine was controlled for. Plasma PLP concentrations were significantly correlated with plasma fasting glucose (r = 20.1, P = 0.0006), glycated hemoglobin (r = 20.08, P = 0.006), and homeostasis model assessment of b cell function (r = 0.082, P = 0.005). Metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes were also significantly associated with low plasma PLP concentrations (P = 0.011, 0.0007, and 0.004, respectively). Conclusions: Low vitamin B-6 concentrations are associated with inflammation, higher oxidative stress, and metabolic conditions in older Puerto Rican adults. Our data suggest that vitamin B-6 may influence cardiovascular disease risk through mechanisms other than homocysteine and support the notion that nutritional status may influence the health disparities present in this population.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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