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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: A comparative study of the retention and lethality of the first and second generation arthropod protein markers

Authors
item Slosky, Lauren -
item Hoffmann, Eric -
item Hagler, James

Submitted to: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 22, 2012
Publication Date: August 1, 2012
Citation: Slosky, L.M., Hoffmann, E.J., Hagler, J.R. 2012. A comparative study of the retention and lethality of the first and second generation arthropod protein markers. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 144(2):165-171.

Interpretive Summary: A greenhouse study was conducted that compared the protein mark retention time of a well established rabbit IgG protein detection protocol with those of three newer, less expensive protocols designed to detect casein in bovine milk, egg albumin in chicken egg whites, and soy trypsin in soy milk, respectively. Adult lady beetles were topically marked with 2.0 ml of rabbit IgG solution, pure bovine milk, pure chicken egg whites, or pure soy milk solutions. The variously marked beetles were then released into cages containing a cotton plant. In turn, beetles were collected every other day for 26 days after marking and examined for the presence of each protein mark by protein-specific assays. Data indicate that the durability of the egg whites > rabbit IgG > milk > soy milk on the beetles. In addition, the survivorship of the beetles was assessed. Data revealed that there were no significant differences in the mean survivorship of the beetles between any of the protein treatments. Mean survivorship ranged from 81% for the milk mark treatment to 86% for the water (control) treatment over the 26 day course of the study.

Technical Abstract: A greenhouse study was conducted that compared the protein mark retention time of a well established rabbit IgG protein detection protocol with those of three newer, less expensive protein detection protocols designed to detect casein in bovine milk, egg albumin in chicken egg whites, and soy trypsin in soy milk, respectively. Adult convergent lady beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), were topically marked with either 2.0 ml of a 5.0 mg/ml rabbit IgG solution or 2.0 ml of pure bovine milk, chicken egg whites, or soy milk solutions. The variously marked cohorts of beetles were then released into cages that contained a single cotton plant. In turn, beetles were collected every other day for 26 days after marking and assayed for the presence of the protein marks by a either a sandwich anti-rabbit IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or an indirect anti-casein, anti-egg albumin or anti-soy trypsin ELISA to detect bovine casein, chicken egg albumin or soy milk trypsin, respectively. Data indicate that the durability of the egg whites > rabbit IgG > milk > soy milk on the beetles. In addition, the survivorship of H. convergens after receiving each protein mark treatment was assessed. Data revealed that there were no significant differences in the mean survivorship of the H. convergens between any of the protein treatments. Mean survivorship ranged from 81% for the milk mark treatment to 86% for the water (control) treatment over the 26 day course of the study.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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