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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Processing Technologies to Prevent Weight Gain and Obesity Related Metabolic Diseases

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Lower weight gain and hepatic lipid content in hamsters fed high fat diets supplemented with white rice protein, brown rice protein, and soy protein and their hydrolysates

Authors
item Huijuan, Zhang -
item Bartley, Glenn
item Mitchell, Cheryl -
item Hui, Zhang -
item Yokoyama, Wallace

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 13, 2011
Publication Date: October 26, 2011
Citation: Huijuan, Z., Bartley, G.E., Mitchell, C., Hui, Z., Yokoyama, W.H. 2011. Lower weight gain and hepatic lipid content in hamsters fed high fat diets supplemented with white rice protein, brown rice protein, and soy protein and their hydrolysates. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 59(20):10297-10933.

Interpretive Summary: Hamsters fed a high fat diet supplemented with hydrolysate of proteins extracted from brown rice gained less weight than control animals. Liver cholesterol was lower and fecal bile acid excretion was higher. Fat metabolism was changed to less storage and more fat burning in the hamsters fed brown rice protein hydrolysate.

Technical Abstract: The physiological effects of the hydrolysates from white rice, brown rice, and soy isolate were compared to the original protein source. White rice, brown rice, and soy protein were hydrolyzed with the food grade enzyme, alcalase2.4 L®. Male Syrian hamsters were fed high-fat diets containing either 20% casein (control) or 20% extracted proteins or their hydrolysates as the protein source for three weeks. The brown rice protein hydrolysate (BRPH) diet group reduced weight gain 76% compared with the control. BRPH fed animals also had lower final body weight, liver weight, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, liver cholesterol and higher fecal fat and bile acid excretion than the control. Feed intake was not different between diet treatments. Expression levels of hepatic genes for lipid oxidation, PPAR a, ACOX1, CPT1 were highest for hamsters fed the BRPH supplemented diet. Expression of CYP7A1, the gene regulating bile acid synthesis, was higher for all rice and soy diets. Expression of CYP51, a gene coding for an enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, was highest in the BRPH diet group. The results suggest that the alcalase hydrolysis of brown rice protein results in unique peptides that reduce weight gain and hepatic cholesterol synthesis.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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