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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AND NUTRIENT CYCLING TO SUSTAIN AGRICULTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA Title: Effect of soil organic carbon level on the erodibility of a U.S. piedmont soil

Authors
item Sedlock, Jordan -
item Raczkowski, Charles -
item Reddy, G -
item Busscher, Warren
item Franzluebbers, Alan
item Bauer, Philip

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 22, 2011
Publication Date: October 16, 2011
Citation: Sedlock, J., Raczkowski, C.W., Reddy, G.B., Busscher, W.J., Franzluebbers, A.J., Bauer, P.J. 2011. Effect of soil organic carbon level on the erodibility of a U.S. piedmont soil [abstract]. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. Available: http://a-c-s.confex.com/crops/2011am/webprogram/Paper67934.html.

Technical Abstract: Intensive soil cultivation and high soil erosion has impoverished levels of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern U.S. Piedmont region. Sound soil management practices that build SOC levels are needed to reduce soil erodibility and restore soil quality. We studied the relationship of SOC content and soil erodibility using a Piedmont soil that has been managed for 7-years using key practices that increase SOC levels, including winter cover cropping, compost applications and no tillage. The soil used, an Enon sandy loam (fine, mixed, thermic, Ultic Hapludalf), was collected in June 2010 from the following treatments in a field study that began in 2003: (i) no tillage summer vegetable planting, (ii) fall applied poultry hatchery compost + winter rye-clover cover crop + no tillage summer vegetable planting, (iii) summer vegetable planting after disk tillage and, (iv) fall applied poultry hatchery compost + winter rye-clover cover crop + summer vegetable planting after disk tillage. A rainfall simulator was used to apply 75 mm hr-1 intensity rain for 1.5 h on a 1 m2 soil pan adjusted to a 9% gradient. Soil erodibility was found to decrease by 14% with each 1% increase in SOC.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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