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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GLOBAL CHANGE IN SEMI-ARID RANGELANDS: ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES AND MANAGEMENT ADAPTATIONS

Location: Rangeland Resources Research

Title: Will extreme climatic events facilitate biological invasions?

Authors
item Diez, Jeffrey -
item D'Antonio, Carla -
item Dukes, Jeffrey -
item Grosholz, Ted -
item Olden, Julien -
item Sorte, Cascade -
item Blumenthal, Dana
item Bradley, Bethany -
item Early, Regan -
item Jones, Sierra -

Submitted to: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2012
Publication Date: June 5, 2012
Citation: Diez, J.D., D'Antonio, C.M., Dukes, J.S., Grosholz, T.D., Olden, J.D., Sorte, C., Blumenthal, D.M., Bradley, B.A., Early, R., Jones, S. 2012. Will extreme climatic events facilitate biological invasions? Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 10:249-257.

Interpretive Summary: Extreme climatic events, such as intense heat waves, hurricanes, floods and droughts, are projected to become more frequent with ongoing climate change. Here, we review evidence that extreme climatic events influence the invasion process, from initial introduction through establishment and spread, and identify mechanisms by which this may occur. We show how extreme events can reduce resistance to invasions, but also sometimes disadvantage established invaders. Given predicted increases in both extreme events and rates of species introductions around the globe during the coming decades, there is an urgent need to understand how these two processes interact to affect ecosystem composition and functioning.

Technical Abstract: Extreme climatic events, such as intense heat waves, hurricanes, floods and droughts, can dramatically affect ecological and evolutionary processes, and more extreme events are projected with ongoing climate change. However, the implications of these events for biological invasions, which themselves can disrupt ecosystems, remain poorly understood. Here, we review evidence that extreme climatic events influence the invasion process, from initial introduction through establishment and spread, and identify mechanisms by which this may occur. We show how extreme events can reduce resistance to invasions, but also sometimes disadvantage established invaders. We use this review to outline priority research areas and management approaches for anticipating future risks of unwanted invasions following extreme events. Given predicted increases in both extreme events and rates of species introductions around the globe during the coming decades, there is an urgent need to understand how these two processes interact to affect ecosystem composition and functioning.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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