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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: A Potential Sampling Error Associated with Insect Protein Mark-Capture Data.

Authors
item Zilnik, Gabriel -
item Hagler, James

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 1, 2011
Publication Date: March 1, 2011
Citation: Zilnik, G., Hagler, J.R. 2011. A Potential Sampling Error Associated with Insect Protein Mark-Capture Data.. Meeting Abstract. 47.

Interpretive Summary: Protein-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) have become effective tools for studying various aspects of arthropod behavior. For instance, protein marks have been applied to insects in mark-release-recapture (MRR) and mark capture type insect dispersal studies. Commercially available proteins have been sprayed using standard spray rigs to mark insects with surrounding areas and analyzed by protein-specific ELISAs for the presence of the various marks. HOwever, concerns have arisen that during sweep net collection, marked insects could transfer the protein mark to unmarked insects in the net by physical contact. This study was designed to examine the degree of lateral transfer of protein from protein-marked insects to unmarked arthropods during the sweep net collection process. Here, we marked cohorts of Lygus hesperus and Hippodamia convergens with a triple protein solution of egg white, milk,and soy and visual mark. We then collected arthropods by sweep net in an alfalfa field populated with various types of arthropods. For each sweep net sample we: conducted 25 sweeps, added 10 protein-marked L. hesperus an H. convergens into the net, and conducted 25 more sweeps. Sweep samples were bagged, frozen and all arthropods were assayed for the presence of each protein by a suite of protein-specific ELISAs. Data indicates that protein marks can transfer, albeit at low frequencies, from marked to unmarked arthropods. These data suggest that alternative collection methods may be necessary for protein MRR and mark-capture studies.

Technical Abstract: Protein-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) have become effective tools for studying various aspects of arthropod behavior. for instance, protein marks have been applied to insects in mark-release-recapture (MRR) and mark capture type insect dispersal studies. Commercially available proteins have been sprayed using standard spray rigs to mark insects with surrounding areas and analyzed by protein-specific ELISAs for the presence of the various marks. HOwever, concerns have arisen that during sweep net collection, marked insects could transfer the protein mark to unmarked insects in the net by physical contact. This study was designed to examine the degree of lateral transfer of protein from protein-marked insects to unmarked arthropods during the sweep net collection process. Here, we marked cohorts of Lygus hesperus and Hippodamia convergens with a triple protein solution of egg white, milk,and soy and visual mark. We then collected arthropods by sweep net in an alfalfa field populated with various types of arthropods. For each sweep net sample we: conducted 25 sweeps, added 10 protein-marked L. hesperus an H. convergens into the net, and conducted 25 more sweeps. Sweep samples were bagged, frozen and all arthropods were assayed for the presence of each protein by a suite of protein-specific ELISAs. Data indicates that protein marks can transfer, albeit at low frequencies, from marked to unmarked arthropods. These data suggest that alternative collection methods may be necessary for protein MRR and mark-capture studies.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014
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