Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INVASIVE PESTS OF ORCHARD AND VEGETABLE CROPS IN THE SUBTROPICAL SOUTH Title: Multimodal cues drive host-plant assessment in Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri)

Authors
item Patt, Joseph
item Meikle, William
item Mafra-Neto, Agenor -
item Setamou, Mamoudou -
item Mangan, Robert
item Yang, Chenghai
item Malik, Nasir
item Adamczyk, John

Research conducted cooperatively with:
item

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 13, 2011
Publication Date: December 1, 2011
Citation: Patt, J.M., Meikle, W.G., Mafra-Neto, A., Setamou, M., Mangan, R.L., Yang, C., Malik, N.S., Adamczyk Jr, J.J. 2011. Multimodal cues drive host-plant assessment in Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri). Environmental Entomology. 40(6):1494-1502.

Interpretive Summary: Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) transmits Huanglongbing (aka citrus greening), the world’s most devastating disease of citrus trees. We measured behavioral responses of ACP to combinations of visual, scent, and taste cues in test arenas. Cue were presented to the psyllids in droplets or lines of an emulsified wax formulation in two different arena types in no-choice tests. First, when placed on a colored ring situated halfway between the center and perimeter of a Petri dish, ACP spent more time on yellow v. gray rings; however, this response disappeared when either gray or yellow wax droplets were applied. When the psyllids were presented with droplets scented with leaf aromas, the response to both scent and color was strong. The addition of a dilute sugar solution to the wax droplets increased the magnitude of ACP responses. Next, groups of ACP were placed on plastic laboratory film covering a heavy sugar solution, to mimic a leaf surface. Test stimuli were presented via two ‘leaf midribs’ made from lines of emulsified wax formulation. Probing levels were measured as a function of color saturation (tint), scent composition, and scent concentration. The test scents were based on qualitatively major aromas emitted by common ACP host plants, orange jasmine, Mexican lime, and sweet orange. The highest probing response was observed on the middle concentration (20 µl scent/10 ml wax formulation) of the lime-scented wax lines. Results indicate that there is a synergy between the different sensory modalities in directing host-plant assessment behavior in ACP.

Technical Abstract: Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) transmits the causal agent of Huanglongbing, a devastating disease of citrus trees. In this study, we measured behavioral responses of D. citri to combinations of visual, olfactory, and gustatory stimuli in test arenas. Stimuli were presented to the psyllids in droplets or lines of an emulsified wax formulation in two different arena types in no-choice tests. First, when placed on a colored ring situated halfway between the center and perimeter of a Petri dish, D. citri spent more time on yellow v. gray rings; however, this response disappeared when either gray or yellow wax droplets were applied. When the psyllids were presented with droplets scented with terpenes, the response to both scent and color was strong. The addition of a dilute (ca. 0.1 M) sucrose solution to the wax droplets increased the magnitude of D. citri responses. Next, groups of D. citri were placed on plastic laboratory film covering a sucrose solution, to mimic a leaf surface. Test stimuli were presented via two ‘midribs’ made from lines of emulsified wax formulation. Probing levels were measured as a function of color saturation and scent composition, and concentration. The test scents were based on qualitatively major volatiles emitted by Murraya paniculata, Citrus aurantifolia, and C. sinensis. The highest probing response was observed on the middle concentration (20 µl scent/10 ml wax formulation) of the C. aurantifolia-scented wax lines. Results indicate that there is a synergy between the different sensory modalities in directing host-plant assessment behavior.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page