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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: Progress in sunflower Sclerotinia research: Pyramiding head rot resistance into elite lines and association mapping of stalk rot resistance using candidate genes

Authors
item Talukder, Zahirul -
item Hulke, Brent
item Qi, Lili
item Gulya, Thomas

Submitted to: Sunflower Research Forum
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 5, 2011
Publication Date: February 5, 2011
Citation: Talukder, Z., Hulke, B.S., Qi, L., Gulya, T.J. 2011. Progress in sunflower Sclerotinia research: Pyramiding head rot resistance into elite lines and association mapping of stalk rot resistance using candidate genes. Sunflower Research Forum, National Sunflower Association, January 19-21, 2011, Fargo, ND. Available: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/searchable-database-of-forum-papers/

Interpretive Summary: The need for sunflower quantitative genetics research to find and capture Sclerotinia resistance is increasing with every year that this disease results in widespread losses in yield and crop quality. We outline how we are trying to increase resistance in cultivated sunflower using current molecular genetics techniques combined with current plant breeding methods. This will benefit the sunflower producers and markets that are reliant on high quality, high yielding sunflower seed and sunflower seed products, because Sclerotinia affects both yield and quality of the crop.

Technical Abstract: The need for sunflower quantitative genetics research to find and capture Sclerotinia resistance is increasing with every year that this disease results in widespread losses in yield and crop quality. Our efforts to perform association mapping with the 260 Plant Introductions (PIs) obtained from the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station of USDA-ARS in Ames, IA, are moving forward. We have finished data analysis on the phenotypic data. Based on the distribution of data, which is more broadly and normally distributed than we were expecting, we believe that the phenotypes will be adequate for mapping using the association mapping model. We are currently completing the development of a marker set for our resistance candidate genes and 10,000 random SNPs from a companion project. This will contribute the necessary genotypes with which we can complete our association model. As soon as all the genotyping is complete, we can run our association analysis, discover marker-trait associations for stalk rot [Sclerotinia Initiative funded this research].

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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