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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIORATIONAL CONTROL METHODS FOR INSECT PESTS OF POTATO

Location: Fruit and Vegetable Insect Research

Title: Age at reproductive maturity and effect of age and time of day on sex sttraction in the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli

Authors
item Guedot, Christelle
item Horton, David
item Landolt, Peter

Submitted to: Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 8, 2011
Publication Date: December 1, 2012
Citation: Guedot, C.N., Horton, D.R., Landolt, P.J. 2012. Age at reproductive maturity and effect of age and time of day on sex sttraction in the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. Insect Science. 19:585-594. DOI 10.1111/j.1744-7917.2011.01498.x.

Interpretive Summary: The potato psyllid is a major pest of commercial potato causing millions of dollars in losses to potato producers and processors in numerous locations in the United States and Mexico. Scientists at the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory examined the effect of age and time of day on sex attraction and the age at which males and females are able to reproduce. Age did not affect sex attraction, with both younger and older males being attracted to females, regardless of female age. Assessment of sex attraction between 8:00AM and 8:00PM revealed that males were attracted to females between 11:00AM and 5:00PM. Adults are able to mate within 48 hrs after they eclose. This study contributes to a better understanding of the reproductive biology and factors affecting sex attraction in the potato psyllid.

Technical Abstract: The potato psyllid, Bactericera (= Paratrioza) cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a major pest of potato. Studies were conducted to determine the age at which both males and females reach reproductive maturity and the effect of age and time of day on sex attraction. Adult B. cockerelli reach reproductive maturity within 48 hrs post-eclosion, with females being mature on the day of eclosion and males at 1 day post-eclosion. Oviposition generally began 2 days after mating but was delayed when females mated within 2 days post-eclosion. In laboratory olfactometer assays, the age of females used as odor sources and the age of males assayed to these odors did not affect sex attraction, with both younger (1-4 day old) and older (8-10 day old) males being attracted to females, regardless of female age (1-4 day old or 8-10 day old). Males assayed to live females at different times in the photophase (between 8:00 and 20:00 hrs) were attracted to females between 11:00 and 17:00 hrs, showing a temporal periodicity in sex attraction with B. cockerelli at least during the photophase.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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