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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOUTH AMERICAN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS TO SUPPRESS INVASIVE PESTS IN THE U.S. Title: New records on the geographical distribution of South American sharpshooters (Cicadellidae:Cicadellinae:Proconiini) and their potential as vectors of Xylella fastidiosa

Authors
item Dellape, Gimena -
item Logarzo, Guillermo -
item Virla, Eduardo -
item Paradell, Susana -

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 23, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2011
Citation: Dellape, G., Logarzo, G.A., Virla, E., Paradell, S. 2011. New records on the geographical distribution of South American sharpshooters (Cicadellidae:Cicadellinae:Proconiini) and their potential as vectors of Xylella fastidiosa. Florida Entomologist. 94(2):364-366.

Interpretive Summary: Many plant diseases such as “Pierce’s Disease” (PD) in grape (Vitis vinífera L.), “Phony Peach Disease” (PPD), “Coffee Leaf Scorch” (CLS), “Oleander Leaf Scorch” (OLS), and “Citrus Variegate Chlorosis” (CVC) are produce for a bacteria endemic of the Americas. The bacteria enter the plant through sap feeding insects of the subfamily of leafhoppers. This note provides information about distribution of potential disease vectors in South America. The 3 main insect collections of Argentina were examined and as result 5 species are cited for the first time from Paraguay; 4 for Perú; 3 for Bolivia; 2 for Ecuador; and 1 each for Uruguay and Brazil.

Technical Abstract: Xylella fastidiosa is endemic to the Americas, it causes economically important diseases in a variety of different crops, and is transmitted by xylem-feeding sharpshooters. This paper provides new geographic records for Proconiini sharpshooters in South America which help to better understand their distribution. To develop these new records, we examined material from 3 of the main entomological collections held in Argentina. As a result, 5 species are cited for the first time from Paraguay; 4 for Perú; 3 for Bolivia; 2 for Ecuador; and 1 each for Uruguay and Brazil. Some of the species could be vectors of X. fastidiosa because congeners of the species studied here are known to transmit this bacterium.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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